GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sun Jun 02, 2013 2:30 pm

rorty

Pronunciation: /ˈrôrtē/

adjective (rortier, rortiest)
British informal
boisterous and high-spirited.

Origin:
mid 19th century: of unknown origin

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Photo Credit: The Next Web

==================================================================

Shorty, turning forty, loved his party.
He and friends were intentionally rorty.
He sang and danced and ate quite hearty.
Then he drank 'till midnight, not coffee, nor tea.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Mon Jun 03, 2013 8:33 am

carrion

Pronunciation: /ˈkarēən/

noun
the decaying flesh of dead animals.

Origin:
Middle English: from Anglo-Norman French and Old Northern French caroine, caroigne, Old French charoigne, based on Latin caro 'flesh'

Image__-^*-_____________________________________________________

Carry on, Carrie Ann. Call the cawing crows to carry off the carrion crushed by the rushing carriage wheels.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Mon Jun 03, 2013 11:39 am

Algot Runeman wrote:carrion

When the besieged garrison's cook confided to the chaplain that there were only a few crumbs left in the foodstore, the priest sighed and said: "Look, this is no time to be picky and squeamish, so when there's dead horse or carrion to be had, I'll chime the carillon.
Now don't get carried away, but keep this under your hat, will you?"
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Tue Jun 04, 2013 2:13 pm

The cabin stewardess asked the last passenger aboard, "May I help you with your carrion bag, sir?"

He gave a puzzled look, confused by her pronunciation.

"It is a 'Carry-on' bag, my dear. It is made of genuine aligator hide, and quite expensive."

"That's what I thought, sir. I saw it was some sort of dead animal skin and spoke of it as such."
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Tue Jun 04, 2013 2:35 pm

aperture

Pronunciation: /ˈapərˌCHər/

noun
chiefly technical
an opening, hole, or gap:the bell ropes passed through apertures in the ceiling
a space through which light passes in an optical or photographic instrument, especially the variable opening by which light enters a camera.

Origin:
late Middle English: from Latin apertura, from apert- 'opened', from aperire 'to open'

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--------------------------------------------o-----O-------------------------------------------

Alex approached the model, adjusted the aperture of his camera to a larger opening so her image would be less sharp and adjusted the exposure time to compensate for the extra light.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Wed Jun 05, 2013 10:29 am

pensive

Pronunciation: /ˈpensiv/

adjective
engaged in, involving, or reflecting deep or serious thought:a pensive mood

Origin:
late Middle English: from Old French pensif, -ive, from penser 'think', from Latin pensare 'ponder', frequentative of pendere 'weigh'

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-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

Arnold was always mentally engaged. He invented many actual implements, but the fun was the thinking part.
His current pensive passion was centered on how to make a pen sieve, one which would help keep his pen collection organized by ink color.

[ "Hum..." pondered Marco, pensively. "I wonder when Rodin will finish today's session. This 'sober meditation' pose is getting to me. I need a drink, maybe three. Where did I leave my clothes, anyway?" ]
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Wed Jun 05, 2013 11:51 am

Algot Runeman wrote:pensive
...
Arnold was always mentally engaged.
...

Schwarzenegger?

Anyway, one sunny day Arnold was thinking, "Wide open for a blurry fore- and background? Or just a slit for a wide depth-of-field?".
For a minute there Arnold was quite pensive about the correct aperture.
Spoiler: show
Image
So he took two shots, one for each exposure setting.

But sadly they were both out of focus. "I had the sun in my eyes.", he said.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Thu Jun 06, 2013 10:23 am

Harry Potter pensively looked into Dumbledore's pensieve.
"Will I ever find the pen Ginny gave me for my birthday, or is it irretrieviably lost in the sieve I dropped it into ?"
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Thu Jun 06, 2013 10:59 am

opprobrious

Pronunciation: /əˈprōbrēəs/

adjective
(of language) expressing opprobrium.

Origin:

late Middle English: from late Latin opprobriosus, from opprobrium (see opprobrium)

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---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Oprah lashed out at Bree with a loud, opprobrious, and potentially slanderous commentary.
Doctor Phil offered to talk with both Oprah and Bree to see if he could make a dollar or two while looking wise on a television program.

[ This is another example of a dictionary failing to come up to the digital age. How difficult would it have been to include the material from opprobrium directly? "harsh criticism or censure" In a paper dictionary, where space is expensive, the pointer is at least logical. It was I who added the link to the ODO, which they didn't for their page defining opprobrious. On line, such a reference is dopey. There, I've given my opprobrious remarks. ]
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Fri Jun 07, 2013 12:28 am

I totally approve of the opprobriousness of your remark on the failure of the dictionary to come up to the digital age.

And no, I don't think that the word opprobriousness is awkwardnessful.

I am grateful for this last beautifulnessful* word to Douglas R. Hofstadter, (in Gödel, Escher, Bach, 1979)
* this word I just coined myself
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Fri Jun 07, 2013 10:08 am

voralfred wrote:I totally approve of the opprobriousness of your remark on the failure of the dictionary to come up to the digital age.

And no, I don't think that the word opprobriousness is awkwardnessful.

I am grateful for this last beautifulnessful* word to Douglas R. Hofstadter, (in Gödel, Escher, Bach, 1979)
* this word I just coined myself

I think you must be obsessed with Nessie ...
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Fri Jun 07, 2013 4:03 pm

manticore

Pronunciation: /ˈmantiˌkôr/

noun
a mythical beast typically depicted as having the body of a lion, the face of a man, and the sting of a scorpion.

Origin:
late Middle English: from Old French, via Latin from Greek mantikhōras, corrupt reading in Aristotle for martikhoras, from an Old Persian word meaning 'man-eater'

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(*)--(*)___________/'_____________________________________________________________

Manny Tickor is always lying about something. His goal usually seems to be setting up some kind of sting in the end. He must have read mythology in his boyhood and had a particular focus on the manticore.

[ I read mythology when I was young. I don't remember the stories that included this beestie. (Well, egg on my face. I didn't read any Persian mythology, and Wikipedia tells me that's the origin.) ]
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sat Jun 08, 2013 5:57 pm

intemperate

Pronunciation: /inˈtemp(ə)rit/

adjective
having or showing a lack of self-control; immoderate:intemperate outbursts concerning global conspiracies
given to or characterized by excessive indulgence, especially in alcohol:an intemperate social occasion

Origin:
late Middle English (in the sense 'inclement'): from Latin intemperatus, from in- 'not' + temperatus (see temperate)

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000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000

Irene incessantly imbibed the local malt,
Her days filled up with alcohol assault.
Intemperate choices and habits bad,
Will a future day, make someone sad.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Sat Jun 08, 2013 6:49 pm

The Star Kingdom of Manticore, consisting of the planets Manticore, Sphinx and Gryphon orbiting the binary stellar system Manticore A and B, and the planet Medusa orbiting the star Basilisk is the setting (called "Honorverse") of the space opera by David Weber having for heroin Honor Harrington (well, not all of the setting, only the heroin's original polity ; the full setting also includes many other political entities. Only the Star Kingdom has this strange bias for mythical monsters.)
I rather like this series, but I do not have for it the same intemperate passion as the one I have for the the Miles Vorkosigan Saga by our resident author LMB, the setting of which is the "Vorkosiverse".
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Sat Jun 08, 2013 11:40 pm

voralfred wrote:... Manticore, Sphinx ... Gryphon ... Medusa ... Basilisk

Would it be intemperate to suggest that the earth-sized Kepler planets be named for these and other mythical creatures? (Centaur, Pegasus, Unicorn, Satyr, Jörmungandr ...)
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Sun Jun 09, 2013 6:16 am

E Pericoloso Sporgersi wrote:(...) these and other mythical creatures? (Centaur, Pegasus, Unicorn, Satyr, Jörmungandr ...)


Dragon ? Vampire ? Jaws ? ...Tooth-fairy ?
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Sun Jun 09, 2013 2:08 pm

voralfred wrote:
E Pericoloso Sporgersi wrote:(...) these and other mythical creatures? (Centaur, Pegasus, Unicorn, Satyr, Jörmungandr ...)

Dragon ? Vampire ? Jaws ? ...Tooth-fairy ?[/url]

Higgs Boson? (though that isn't mythical any more)
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Sun Jun 09, 2013 4:39 pm

Do you mean Ichiren-bōzu , or Iwana-bōzu ?

None of them have big teeth, alas, as I understand, but I believe that their half-life is much longer than a femtosecond....
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sun Jun 09, 2013 5:32 pm

The Honorable heroine honestly hated heroin.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sun Jun 09, 2013 5:36 pm

casbah

Pronunciation: /ˈkazˌbä/

noun
the citadel of a North African city.
(the casbah) the area surrounding a North African citadel, typically in the old part of a city.

Origin:
mid 18th century: French, from Arabic ḳaṣaba 'citadel'

--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--

Sam wanted to sit in a dell to do his drinking, but the wedding was indoors, followed by a cash bar.
The groom couldn't wait to assault the citadel, but, at the reception, her family surrounded her like a veritable casbah.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Sun Jun 09, 2013 6:51 pm

Algot Runeman wrote:casbah

Pronunciation: /ˈkazˌbä/

noun
the citadel of a North African city.
(the casbah) the area surrounding a North African citadel, typically in the old part of a city.

Origin:
mid 18th century: French, from Arabic ḳaṣaba 'citadel'

--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--H--

Sam wanted to sit in a dell to do his drinking, but the wedding was indoors, followed by a cash bar.
The groom couldn't wait to assault the citadel, but, at the reception, her family surrounded her like a veritable casbah.


Of course I cannot resist giving you the link to the delightful song
"Pourquoi la Casbah l'a brûlé, mon-z-ami" ("Why did the Casbah burn down, mah' friend")
http://pplemoqueur.blogspot.fr/2011/05/ ... -quon.html
but because it is highly non-politically-correct I'll leave those who are interested find their own translation...
Upon reaching the last verse you are supposed to start back at the beginning, in an unending loop.

I understand that "la Casbah" with the definite article (= "the Casbah") in this song means the Casbah of Algiers as being the ultimate one.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Mon Jun 10, 2013 2:29 am

Algot Runeman wrote:casbah

noun
origin of the anglicised cashback

Ex.
The more you haggle in the casbah's bazaar, the more cashback you'll get.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Mon Jun 10, 2013 3:59 pm

torpid

Pronunciation: /ˈtôrpid/

adjective
mentally or physically inactive; lethargic:we sat around in a torpid state
(of an animal) dormant, especially during hibernation.

Origin:
late Middle English: from Latin torpidus, from torpere 'be numb or sluggish'

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★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆

Tim treasured the torpid days of summer vacation. They always started early and ended late. But, just because he was awake more than asleep in the days' 24 hours, his activities were self-selected instead of imposed by bosses. They relaxed him. He felt more at ease minute by minute.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Mon Jun 10, 2013 10:48 pm

Algot Runeman wrote:torpid

The helmsman whispered to his assistant, "I hope the skipper sends a couple torpedos. That'll wake up those torpid bastards."
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Wed Jun 12, 2013 7:36 am

segue

Pronunciation: /ˈsegwā, ˈsā-/

verb (segues, segueing /ˈsegwā-iNG, ˈsā-/, segued /ˈsegwād, ˈsā-/)
[no object]
(in music and film) move without interruption from one song, melody, or scene to another:allowing one song to segue into the next

noun
an uninterrupted transition from one piece of music or film scene to another.

Origin:
Italian, literally 'follows'

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Heel, Barney."
The dog glanced at Joe and stepped back to sit beside his right knee.
Marcy gazed at the St. Bernard and wondered if there was any way to segue smoothly into a discussion of her business plan.
No, she decided and just jumped into her pitch, anyway.
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