Winston Graham's bibliography

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Winston Graham's bibliography

Postby David » Thu Feb 05, 2004 2:39 am

Out of interest I've been trying to find a list of all of Winston's books and so far I've got to 37, but appreciate it if anyone knows of any more of the officially published ones ?

1. Night Journey
2. Cordelia
3. The Forgotten Story
4. The Merciless Ladies
5. Night Without Stars
6. Take My Life
7. Fortune is a Woman
8. The Little Walls
9. The Sleeping Partner
10. Greek Fire
11. The Tumbled House
12. Marnie
13. The Grove of Eagles
14. After the Act
15. The Walking Stick
16. Angell, Pearl and Little God
17. The Japanese Girl (short stories)
18. Woman in the Mirror
19. The Green Flash
20. Cameo
21. Stephanie
22. Tremor
23. The Ugly Sister
24. The Spanish Armada
25. Poldark's Cornwall

That's all of them so far which including the 12 Poldark ones makes a total of 37 books in all.

I have to confess however I've only managed to read three to date (!) the Omnibus edition of Greek Fire, The Forgotten Story and Marnie and whilst they're all completely different and very well written, for me personally it's Poldark still well on top mainly I think because nearly all of them were so hard to put down.

(Interesting that. I wonder how many judge the final quality of an author's work solely, partially or never on how hard it is to put down ?)

Whilst he says on the first page of his autobiography that he regarded himself simply as a popular novelist, it's been very interesting to discover just how deep and wide-ranging all his literary skills and abilities really were and how he was able to selectively focus them so passionately and so well into the first three or four early Poldark novels. I also seem to remember reading somewhere that he said the whole Poldark series in fact started out as an 18th Century romance and love triangle ? And though I haven't been able to prove this one way or the other, it might also start to explain the differences between his passionate early books and his later perhaps more detached ones once he'd satisfied his interim interest in "the modern world, and particularly the techniques of suspense". (Ref. WG's preface to The Black Moon.) And if this assumption in it's turn is also correct, then logically there should be other "early period" romantic books also possessing this same excellent detailed and highly passionate approach as well ? Meaning finally one has to start out by reading through all of his earliest romantic works first to see if any of this holds true....well I'm hoping I will gradually one day ! :)

Which raises another interesting question. How do you think your second most favourite author of all might have dealt instead with some of the less interesting books, characters and/or incidents in the Poldark series ?

Ranging from say Chaucer, Shakespeare, Bronte, Thackeray, Hardy, Conrad, Shute, Hemingway, Mailer and so on....? Or yourself ?

For starters I think in "Bella" - "Alas poor George I knew him well".

Or how'zabout Valentine and the ape....Carrington....Demelza and Hugh Armitage ? :)
Last edited by David on Fri Feb 27, 2004 3:47 am, edited 2 times in total.
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I think I've found another one!

Postby Rebecca » Thu Feb 05, 2004 3:38 am

I can't resist a challenge, David. Don't hold 'ee's breath, but I might just have found another one. ;) :banana:

Here 'tis:

The Cornish Farm. Bath, Chivers: July 1982.

ISBN: 0851191762

The notes I found with the library record said:

Short stories in English, 1945-
Originally published: London : Collins, 1971.
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Postby David » Thu Feb 05, 2004 4:10 am

Aw....thankee most kindly, proper job indeed ma'am !!!! :lol:

I copied the list straight out of Pan McMillan's Bella published in 2003 too !! :roll:

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Postby pdrumpole » Thu Feb 05, 2004 7:47 am

You have posed some very interesting questions, David. Since I have only read "The Ugly Sister" (a later book) and "Cordelia" (an early one), and of course all of the Poldark saga, my general impression is that while well-written, the first two lack the "passion" of the Poldark series. I have always felt that Winston Graham fell in love with his story of the Poldarks and with the characters he created, in particular, Demelza. (I think that in his memoirs he says that some of his wife is in Demelza). That may sound rather silly and romantic, but he portrayed them in such a vivid fashion that I believe that they came alive to him and thus to each of each readers. Why else, would we care so much what happened to them and why when something bad happens do we feel sad and when things are going well, feel uplifted and happy.

We are all shaped by what happens to us over the years and with each book not only do the characters get older, the author does and may see things in a somewhat different fashion. Death and growing old seem to be a theme that runs through some of the books. I would guess that growing older may have been a part of the reason that the later books in the saga lacked the energy and passion of the first seven.

I cannot say that I judge an author's work by how difficult it is to put it down. The beauty of language takes time to read and sometimes reread and in a series of books like the Poldarks, I did not want them to end, but to go on and on. There are books that I have read to find out what happens (John Grisham, for exampe), but they are not books that I would reread.

I have many favorite authors and one of them is P.D. James. She definitely would have had George murdered, probably in his bank vault (if there was one). The cast of suspects would have included Ross, Demelza, Elizabeth and everyone who came in contact with him. I have not yet decided who the murderer would be, but he or she would not be caught or would have a perfect defense. I know that this did not happen, but it would still make a good story.

Rita
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A few more books . . .

Postby Carolyn » Thu Feb 05, 2004 8:32 am

Here's a few more early ones with year of publication in brackets:

The House with the Stained Glass Windows (1934)
Into the Fog (1935)
The Riddle of John Rowe (1935)
Without Motive (1936)
The Dangerous Pawn (1937)
The Giant's Chair (1938)
Keys of Chance (1938)
Strangers Meeting (1939)
No Exit (1940)
My Turn Next (1942)
The Wreck of the Grey Cat (1958)

I've always thought the first four Poldark books he wrote had an energy and charm that the others didn't quite match, enjoyable though they were. But I'm sure not everyone will agree!
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Re: books

Postby Sarah » Thu Feb 05, 2004 9:24 am

Are these all Winston Graham??? :shock: Bloomin' 'eck, have I got some reading ahead of me!!!

Better get started on Marnie then!

Would it be possible for anyone who has read anything else by WG just to post a couple of words about genre and setting? (eg, Ross Poldark, Cornwall 1790's, Romance) Then those of us who are a bit fussy might find it easier to be guided towards books they may prefer.

Or is this a really stupid idea? :smash:
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Postby KiltanneN » Thu Feb 05, 2004 11:00 am

I can't resist - ;)

Why don't you guys also fill in the Add A Book for each of these?

That way they could get entered into the Winston Graham Bibliography list...

Not every field is *required* but the more data that goes in - the better it is at the end...

There is a web page I have found that has a listing of lots of other books by Winston Graham - I just have not had time to do the data entry. [If somebody could grab the Blurbs and ISBN's from Amazon at the same time that makes the data so much better...]

Winston Graham non Poldark Books

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Re: books

Postby KiltanneN » Thu Feb 05, 2004 11:02 am

Sarah wrote:Or is this a really stupid idea? :smash:


Not a stupid idea at all, at all. In fact - that is the basis of The Critics Corner

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Re: books

Postby Sarah » Thu Feb 05, 2004 11:34 am

kiltannen wrote:I can't resist - ;)

Why don't you guys also fill in the Add A Book for each of these?

That way they could get entered into the Winston Graham Bibliography list...

kilt

Well, I've jumped in and added the Ugly Sister as it's the only other one I've ever read! Next..........! :D
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Re: A few more books . . .

Postby David » Thu Feb 05, 2004 1:17 pm

Carolyn wrote:Here's a few more early ones with year of publication in brackets:

The House with the Stained Glass Windows (1934)
Into the Fog (1935)
The Riddle of John Rowe (1935)
Without Motive (1936)
The Dangerous Pawn (1937)
The Giant's Chair (1938)
Keys of Chance (1938)
Strangers Meeting (1939)
No Exit (1940)
My Turn Next (1942)
The Wreck of the Grey Cat (1958)


Thanks a lot Carolyn ! :D If my maths are correct this now brings the total up to 49....

Kinda like the look of Strangers Meeting in 1939 as it reminds me of that wartime film - wasn't it called "Brief Encounter" ? The final parting love scene on the station platform with Michael Howard and Pamela ? Also around the same period as Gone With The Wind too I think, so could be right up WG's street....
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Winston's other characters and skills.

Postby David » Fri Feb 06, 2004 8:24 am

pdrumpole wrote:I have always felt that Winston Graham fell in love with his story of the Poldarks and with the characters he created, in particular, Demelza. (I think that in his memoirs he says that some of his wife is in Demelza). That may sound rather silly and romantic, but he portrayed them in such a vivid fashion that I believe that they came alive to him and thus to each of each readers. Why else, would we care so much what happened to them and why when something bad happens do we feel sad and when things are going well, feel uplifted and happy.

We are all shaped by what happens to us over the years and with each book not only do the characters get older, the author does and may see things in a somewhat different fashion. Death and growing old seem to be a theme that runs through some of the books. I would guess that growing older may have been a part of the reason that the later books in the saga lacked the energy and passion of the first seven.

Rita


Thanks for your interesting reply Rita.

Whilst I still have to watch the final 2 videos and get past Chapter 4 of his autobiography, I think I first needed to set down just a few general thoughts beforehand so as to be able to mull over and compare it all afterwards.

I think you could well be right that he might have fallen in love with all the Poldark characters he created and was therefore able to become so closely involved with them. That there could well have existed strong examples and parallels within his own circles of family and friends. That inevitably as one grows older so the prolific fires and creative juices die down. But by extension I also think that it's these very same facts that start to make things interesting, because I'm curious to see if perhaps he might have also become just as closely involved, fallen in love in the same absorbing way with still more characters in his other early books as well. Meaning hopefully there are yet more hidden Winston treasures out there still waiting to be unearthed ! The overall rationale therefore being that if this same close involvement is not apparent or so clearly obvious in any of his other early books, then the early Poldark books must surely come to represent Winston Graham at his finest and most creative best ? With presumably the final cut-off date being at the end of the fourth or seventh novel etc.

Which also means a fair amount of reading as Sarah pointed out ! :)

However I feel one of his most intriguing talents of all, so well displayed in Poldark and why I'm also just as curious to see if they too are repeated elsewhere, was his ability to effortlessly range between the furthest extremes of highly subjective emotional styles and highly objective analytical ones. And whilst his prose and writing style have always been truly masterful, for me I think it's this incredibly wide see-sawing range between the two different styles that makes Poldark so intensely absorbing and therefore so hard to put down. A personal view of course. Perhaps it's one of the very first technical skills all budding (suspense ?) writers must learn by heart from the beginning !

Starting from a distraught Cuby surrounded by the overpowering stench of death desperately seeking news of Jeremy, having to force her way through the oncoming baggage carts and wounded etc., her final reactions upon learning the awful truth from Ross - all of which I found to be the most emotive scenes of all in his entire 12 books. Across into his superbly drawn humorous passages that even now still have me laughing whenever I suddenly think of them, something that no other author has ever achieved to such a constant degree ! I mean Jesus Christ born in Sawle with the thickest of Cornish accents ! :lol: Or Music about to give chillblain oil as a love potion ! Wonderful ! :lol: These two examples are perhaps the funniest sequences of all for me in Poldark.

Then over to the other side into his objective in-depth analyses. For example the detailed strategies of the Peninsular campaign and Waterloo all carefully linked back into the numerous political crises and intrigues going on in Parliament, plus Lord Liverpool and George Canning who of course were real people and politically very much centre stage at the time. There's many more similar examples, but I do know that I've yet to find another author equally capable of producing such an extraordinarily wide and absorbing, emotional and intellectual range of narrative styles anywhere.

Perhaps I don't want to ! :wink:
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Postby pdrumpole » Fri Feb 06, 2004 1:51 pm

David, do you think that any posters on the board who are interested in other Winston Graham writings could pick one, all read it and then discuss it? Perhaps we could start with one of the earlier books. I am not sure how it would work, but it might be interesting.

I have no specific book in mind and would be willing to read whatever is chosen (assuming that I can find a copy).

Rita
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Postby Carolyn » Sat Feb 07, 2004 4:24 pm

I've used Kilt's link above to add "The Grove of Eagles", which was first published in 1963 by Hodder and Stoughton although my copy is by Fontana in 1970.

This book is set in 16th century Cornwall and some names you'll encounter which are familiar to Poldark readers include: Killigrew, Godolphin, Carew, Enys, Roscarrock and Boscawen. I took a while to "get into it" but once you become caught up in the main character, Maugan Killigrew, it's hard to put down.

There's also lots of historical stuff dealing with the Spanish Armada and Elizabethan politics. (Couldn't find the ISBN :? )
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Postby Rebecca » Sun Feb 08, 2004 1:32 am

According to this website:(Fantastic Fiction): http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/autho ... Graham.htm, The Little Walls (1955) was also known as Bridge to Vengeance, and there's another novel listed there that I haven't seen before: The Wreck of the Grey Cat (1958).

The site also gives ISBNs where available, and this is the one it gives for Carolyn's 1970 Fontana edition of The Grove of Eagles: 0006123139.
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Postby David » Sun Feb 08, 2004 9:37 am

Thanks to you both Carolyn and Rebecca - great stuff !! :thumb:

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Some First Draft Thoughts & Suggestions Only :-)

Postby David » Sun Feb 08, 2004 10:10 am

pdrumpole wrote:David, do you think that any posters on the board who are interested in other Winston Graham writings could pick one, all read it and then discuss it? Perhaps we could start with one of the earlier books. I am not sure how it would work, but it might be interesting.

I have no specific book in mind and would be willing to read whatever is chosen (assuming that I can find a copy).

Rita


Hi Rita :)
(Scroll below this list)

1 Ross Poldark - 1945
2 Demelza
3 Jeremy Poldark
4 Warleggan - 1953
5 The Black Moon
6 The Four Swans
7 The Angry Tide - 1977
8 Stranger From The Sea
9 The Millers Dance
10 The Loving Cup
11 The Twisted Sword
12 Bella
___________________________

13 Poldark's Cornwall
14 Night Journey
15 Cordelia
16 The Forgotten Story
17 The Merciless Ladies
18 Night Without Stars
19 Take My Life
20 Fortune is a Woman
21 The Little Walls
22 The Sleeping Partner
23 Greek Fire
24 The Tumbled House
25 Marnie
26 The Grove of Eagles
27 After the Act
28 The Walking Stick
29 Angell, Pearl and Little God
30 The Japanese Girl (short stories)
31 Woman in the Mirror
32 The Green Flash
33 Cameo
34 Stephanie
35 Tremor
36 The Ugly Sister
37 The Spanish Armada
(Some details and dates quoted from here earlier)
38 The Cornish Farm. Bath, Chivers: July 1982.
39 The House with the Stained Glass Windows (1934)
40 Into the Fog (1935)
41 The Riddle of John Rowe (1935)
42 Without Motive (1936)
43 The Dangerous Pawn (1937)
44 The Giant's Chair (1938)
45 Keys of Chance (1938)
46 Strangers Meeting (1939)
47 No Exit (1940)
48 My Turn Next (1942)
49 The Wreck of the Grey Cat (1958)
50 The Little Walls (1955)
51 ?
_____________________________________________________


Well - looks like we've hit the magic 50 ! Anyway just a few quick thoughts and suggestions to begin with, but which I hope at least give some idea how best to set about identifying Winston Graham's finest and most creative work(s).

Firstly it would be well worth knowing if anyone else is curious about any other interesting characteristics of Winston as well, so that it can also be included at this very early planning stage too.

Next it would be essential to obtain as much as information as possible from all available sources anywhere on all the 38+ remaining books, with any further publications discovered later easily being inserted into the appropriate slots. All this information can then be collated, gradually sorted and categorised, thereby usefully creating at the same time a reliable long term "Winston Graham Works" computerised mini database and reference source. Once complete this database should obviously make all future W.G. and Poldark questions and requirements a whole lot simpler and quicker to access, rather than constantly having to keep searching for items that ought to have been logged in properly somewhere to begin with. A really frustrating time and effort waster if ever there was one ! :slap:

Hi Kilt :)
Hoping it's not going over old ground (as usual !) but really appreciate at this point all your own thoughts and any possible assistance you might be able to offer. If you can ? Even though without doubt everything is instantly available somewhere here on your great site, would it be possible to perhaps have some sort of quick and simple Winston Graham clickable "Index of Topics" or similar on it's own somewhere, as lately I've been on several fascinating expeditions to find things without luck :( Computers it seems to me like all things electrical and mechanical were deliberately designed to regularly drive most people to the very edge of despair, something that a 100lb sledgehammer was deliberately designed to resolve. Thankfully.

So....:wink:

First. All his 50+ books would have to be placed onto the database in order of date of first publication.

Second. To log into the database as many details as possible of all 38+ book's ISBN, genre details etc. which I suspect could be quickly obtained via the best literary search engines ?

Third. How to begin locating copies of all remaining 38+ books whilst passing all useful search routes, details and information etc. obtained back to the database.

Fourth. Unfortunately I haven't had time to sort out the differences between the fourth and seventh novels, so appreciate all contributions to see whether it's possible to get an idea of a mutually agreed cut-off date or not. If not then perhaps to have two separate lists 1 - 4 and 1 - 7 instead....?

Finally. Ideally in order to clearly establish as near to 100 per cent as possible and without any shade of doubt that the early Poldark novels from 1 - 4/7 definitely represented Winston Graham at his finest and most creative best, all remaining 38+ books will gradually have to be checked/ read carefully through together at some stage with all comments etc. back into the database ! :) However as a suggestion to begin with, to consider perhaps starting with all his romantic novels published between the (as agreed) years 19 - and 19 - set in the period say between the 16th - 18th Century whether Cornish or not. Alternatively all romantic novels between the same (as agreed) years of 19 - and 19 - ? Or all Cornish novels ? Or any other suggestions....

Can't think of anything else for the moment but obviously everyone please suggest any additions or deletions you'd like to see etc....

Bit rushed this weekend so apologies for any obvious errors....it's only a very rough first draft thoughts and suggestions outline for the moment.... :)
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Re: Some First Draft Thoughts & Suggestions Only :-)

Postby KiltanneN » Sun Feb 08, 2004 9:21 pm

David wrote:Hi Kilt :)
Hoping it's not going over old ground (as usual !) but really appreciate at this point all your own thoughts and any possible assistance you might be able to offer. If you can ? Even though without doubt everything is instantly available somewhere here on your great site, would it be possible to perhaps have some sort of quick and simple Winston Graham clickable "Index of Topics" or similar on it's own somewhere, as lately I've been on several fascinating expeditions to find things without luck :( Computers it seems to me like all things electrical and mechanical were deliberately designed to regularly drive most people to the very edge of despair, something that a 100lb sledgehammer was deliberately designed to resolve. Thankfully.


Hi David I certainly do have some things to offer.

Let's see, I'll try and mix my answers in with your questions so that you can work your way through them

My first comment is that you have just run up against the second reason that this Website was built - to contain discussions and database together in one great big whole. There does exist a current listing of Winston Graham works - which is limited pretty much to Poldark at this point:
Winston Graham Books


David wrote:So....:wink:

First. All his 50+ books would have to be placed onto the database in order of date of first publication.


I am working on a model of user contributed data - So yes guys it would work for you to all contribute his 50+ books - I gave a link earlier in this thread

David wrote:Second. To log into the database as many details as possible of all 38+ book's ISBN, genre details etc. which I suspect could be quickly obtained via the best literary search engines ?


Yes it is important to log in the first data entry as much info as possible - especially considering how you guys are wanting to use this. However - Your comment about literary search engines, well it runs up agauinst the very first reason this site was built. & that is to list all the books a writer has written - preferrably with some good detail in their data. And definately with what series they are in and what order in the series they are... This data does not seem to exist much elswhere on the NET in a cohesive fashion... Hence the lack of a "Literary Search Engine" Idf you do find such a beast - LET ME KNOW! ;)

David wrote:Third. How to begin locating copies of all remaining 38+ books whilst passing all useful search routes, details and information etc. obtained back to the database.


I suggest threads such as this one within the Poldark Fora is the best way to go with this one... - Also - don't forget the Amazon links - they only work for American's [because of the cost of shipping 'naught else] If the book is out of print it may exist in the Amazon "Marketplace" - This is a big second hand fair...

David wrote:Fourth. Unfortunately I haven't had time to sort out the differences between the fourth and seventh novels, so appreciate all contributions to see whether it's possible to get an idea of a mutually agreed cut-off date or not. If not then perhaps to have two separate lists 1 - 4 and 1 - 7 instead....?


Any reading lists within the threads can be structured how you like - but there are not likely to be any "special" fields set up in the database for this purpose *sorry!*

David wrote:Finally. Ideally in order to clearly establish as near to 100 per cent as possible and without any shade of doubt that the early Poldark novels from 1 - 4/7 definitely represented Winston Graham at his finest and most creative best, all remaining 38+ books will gradually have to be checked/ read carefully through together at some stage with all comments etc. back into the database ! :) However as a suggestion to begin with, to consider perhaps starting with all his romantic novels published between the (as agreed) years 19 - and 19 - set in the period say between the 16th - 18th Century whether Cornish or not. Alternatively all romantic novels between the same (as agreed) years of 19 - and 19 - ? Or all Cornish novels ? Or any other suggestions....

Can't think of anything else for the moment but obviously everyone please suggest any additions or deletions you'd like to see etc....

PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE
put your comments in the form of entries into "The Critic's Corner" Take a glance in there - there is an existing structure - and it will work reasonably well for all of "you lot" too... ;) My reason for asking this will benefit you as much as it will Me.

I am currently in development to link posts in the Critics corner with the relevant books. I will make 0, Nada, none whatsoever, nein effort to find any of those posts that are not in that specific fora when I do complete this development. [Likely to be some weeks if not a couple of months away]. When I do complete it - you will see links to reviews available from the detailed view of each book. This will become HUGELY valuable down the road - And I expect everybody to like it - but it is down the road - and I want to backfill any reviews back to the relevant books...

Hopefully this will give you some idea as to what I can do to help in your endeavour - In the process of data entry - please have a little patience - each book goes through my hands as a validation - and I will typically do that once every week or so...

On the subject of 1st pub date for the Poldark books - As of right now there is no interface for modifying existing data - so I will need to do that. if anybody cares to provide me a list from 1-12 and list each pub date I will committ to entering those in.

Hope this all helps - regards
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Right, let's get reading!

Postby Sarah » Tue Feb 10, 2004 7:58 am

I have just ordered Angell, Pearl and Little God and Grove of Eagles (the first because I liked the title - no idea of the genre, and the second 'cos it's Cornwall). :D

Really can't get my head round reading Marnie :smash: so I think I'm going to start with Grove of Eagles.

At least if I've read outside Poldark I'll feel like I have something to contribute on his writing in general, which I don't feel I can at the moment.

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Re: Some First Draft Thoughts & Suggestions Only :-)

Postby David » Tue Feb 10, 2004 9:12 am

Hi Kilt :)

David wrote:First. All his 50+ books would have to be placed onto the database in order of date of first publication.


I am working on a model of user contributed data - So yes guys it would work for you to all contribute his 50+ books - I gave a link earlier in this thread


Sounds good ! :) Long job ?

David wrote:Second. To log into the database as many details as possible of all 38+ book's ISBN, genre details etc. which I suspect could be quickly obtained via the best literary search engines ?


Yes it is important to log in the first data entry as much info as possible - especially considering how you guys are wanting to use this.


So that we can get started, immediately if anyone wants (?), it'll be easy enough I would have thought for any of us on here to start up and maintain a simple database of contributed data and facts etc. until things are properly up and running your end.

David wrote:Third. How to begin locating copies of all remaining 38+ books whilst passing all useful search routes, details and information etc. obtained back to the database.


I suggest threads such as this one within the Poldark Fora is the best way to go with this one... - Also - don't forget the Amazon links - they only work for American's [because of the cost of shipping 'naught else] If the book is out of print it may exist in the Amazon "Marketplace" - This is a big second hand fair...


Useful, also not forgetting the many second-hand bookshops in everyone's area too ? There's certainly plenty of old ones down here especially of the antiquarian sort which obviously has to be the best chance of finding the very early pre-war books etc. They shouldn't be that expensive either !! :wink:

David wrote:Fourth. Unfortunately I haven't had time to sort out the differences between the fourth and seventh novels, so appreciate all contributions to see whether it's possible to get an idea of a mutually agreed cut-off date or not. If not then perhaps to have two separate lists 1 - 4 and 1 - 7 instead....?


Any reading lists within the threads can be structured how you like - but there are not likely to be any "special" fields set up in the database for this purpose *sorry!*


I think you might perhaps have misunderstood this one ? It's not a reading list that's being referred to here rather a continuing discussion on this Forum, as everyone interested in contributing on this fourth point will have read all the books already. It's simply a matter of personal opinion as to the most likely mutually agreed cut-off date when Winston's literary skills and creativity were felt to be at their highest, and at what point or year people felt they had waned. If there's no agreement on this date which is quite reasonable and possible then....?

This was largely because there was a rough gap of either two to three years between each novel in what we call his "early" books, and perhaps five, ten whatever in his later ones. Some people feel that this waning became very apparent after the fourth novel, others after the seventh.

David wrote:Finally. Ideally in order to clearly establish as near to 100 per cent as possible and without any shade of doubt that the early Poldark novels from 1 - 4/7 definitely represented Winston Graham at his finest and most creative best, all remaining 38+ books will gradually have to be checked/ read carefully through together at some stage with all comments etc. back into the database ! :) However as a suggestion to begin with, to consider perhaps starting with all his romantic novels published between the (as agreed) years 19 - and 19 - set in the period say between the 16th - 18th Century whether Cornish or not. Alternatively all romantic novels between the same (as agreed) years of 19 - and 19 - ? Or all Cornish novels ? Or any other suggestions....

Can't think of anything else for the moment but obviously everyone please suggest any additions or deletions you'd like to see etc....


PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE
put your comments in the form of entries into "The Critic's Corner"


No, no Kilt you're way, way too early !! lol :-) We're still at the very early planning stages....thine highly commendable enthusiasm doth know no bounds Sire !! :wink:

All my quoted extract above (from "Finally." to "like to see etc....") was simply a final general message to everyone else on the Forum here to see if there was anything further they wished to see discussed, added or deleted in this first rough draft outline programme from any of the above five numbered points only. :)

So if there is still anything anyone....? :)

I am currently in development to link posts in the Critics corner with the relevant books. I will make 0, Nada, none whatsoever, nein effort to find any of those posts that are not in that specific fora when I do complete this development. [Likely to be some weeks if not a couple of months away]


No rush at all thanks as it'll definitely take us a fair while on this international "Winston Graham Treasure Hunt" (?) to read through as well as locate most of the (20's ?),'30's, 40's, 50's and 60's etc. non-Poldark books anyway :)

On the subject of 1st pub date for the Poldark books - As of right now there is no interface for modifying existing data - so I will need to do that. if anybody cares to provide me a list from 1-12 and list each pub date I will committ to entering those in.


Thanks....anyone got a moment ? :)

Hope this all helps - regards
Kilt


Yes it does and many thanks for all your help and suggestions Kilt ! :thumb:

As I said at the end of my previous message don't forget that all of this right here and now is still only a very early rough first draft outline so obviously it might have to be modified or updated etc. now and again. Do let me know if there's anything still unclear either on here or as a pm, though it won't be immediate unfortunately as I've a load of work on at the moment so excuse any obvious errors ! :)

Either road nuthin's goin' be happenin' o'night thass fur sartin' sure m'lad !! :wink:

Here's to t'all !! :beer:
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Re: Right, let's get reading!

Postby Rebecca » Tue Feb 10, 2004 8:12 pm

Sarah wrote:I have just ordered Angell, Pearl and Little God and Grove of Eagles (the first because I liked the title - no idea of the genre, and the second 'cos it's Cornwall). :D

Really can't get my head round reading Marnie :smash: so I think I'm going to start with Grove of Eagles.


Sarah, I'm really relieved that you're going to start with Grove of Eagles ;) because just this morning I managed to find Angell, Peal and Little God on the open shelves at the library and - naturally! - grabbed it. I hope my reading it also is okay :?: I'll be really interested to know what you think of it, and would look forward to sharing impressions with you when we've both finished it. :)
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First publication dates for Poldark

Postby Carolyn » Wed Feb 11, 2004 3:42 am

Kilt & David, first publication date and publisher in brackets:

1. Ross Poldark (1945- Ward Lock)
2. Demelza (1946 - Ward Lock)
3. Jeremy Poldark (1950 - Ward Lock)
4. Warleggan (1953 - Ward Lock)
5. The Black Moon (1973 - William Collins Sons & Co Ltd)
6. The Four Swans (1976 - William Collins Sons & Co Ltd)
7. The Angry Tide (1977 - William Collins Sons & Co Ltd)
8. The Stranger from the Sea (1981 - William Collins Sons & Co Ltd)
9. The Miller's Dance (1982 - William Collins Sons & Co Ltd)
10. The Loving Cup (1984 - William Collins Sons & Co Ltd)
11. TheTwisted Sword (1990 - Chapmans)
12. Bella Poldark (2002 - ?)

Some internet sites list different publication dates to the above but these are what's printed in my copies of the books. Don't know who published "Bella" first, perhaps someone else can post that info.

Sarah, when you read "Grove of Eagles" you'll find Maugan Killegrew a different kind of hero to Ross Poldark - as the blurb says "a man of his time" - whose family crest is a two-headed eagle and each head facing a different way. But typical of Winston Graham, a book of great depth with the personal story interspersed with fascinating details of the time and the world of the time. Hope you enjoy it.

I have a few more of Winston Graham's books - other than Poldark - and will put them into the "Add A Book" section when I've got more time.

Rebecca, this is probably a dumb question but where do you find the ISBN - is it printed in the book somewhere or is it only on the internet :?. I've never bought anything over the net so that explains my ignorance!
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Re: First publication dates for Poldark

Postby Rebecca » Wed Feb 11, 2004 5:11 am

Carolyn wrote:12. Bella Poldark (2002 - ?)

Some internet sites list different publication dates to the above but these are what's printed in my copies of the books. Don't know who published "Bella" first, perhaps someone else can post that info.


I believe Macmillan published Bella Poldark - but I'm happy to be corrected. :)

Carolyn wrote:Rebecca, this is probably a dumb question but where do you find the ISBN - is it printed in the book somewhere or is it only on the internet :?: . I've never bought anything over the net so that explains my ignorance!


It's not a dumb question, Carolyn! Yes, the ISBN (which stands for International Standard Book Number) is found somewhere in the book. One good place to look for it is on the page where the publication date and place of publication, author's right to copyright etc. are printed - usually the facing page after the title page. In the case of Angell, Pearl and Little God, however, I found the ISBN on the inside back flap of the dust jacket. In the case of Amazon, when you get to a specific page about a book, it should say something like: 'More product information'. I know in the case of Amazon.co.uk - sorry, Kilt! :oops: - this section gives you the edition type, publisher + date, no of pages, and the ISBN. I hope this helps, Carolyn. :)
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Re: Right, let's get reading!

Postby Sarah » Wed Feb 11, 2004 5:12 am

Rebecca wrote:
Sarah, I'm really relieved that you're going to start with Grove of Eagles ;) because just this morning I managed to find Angell, Peal and Little God on the open shelves at the library and - naturally! - grabbed it. I hope my reading it also is okay :?: I'll be really interested to know what you think of it, and would look forward to sharing impressions with you when we've both finished it. :)


Rebecca, read away! :D It will be good to swap thoughts once we've finished.

I have to admit though, I got a bit impatient waiting for my books to arrive (I only ordered them yesterday!! :slap: ) so I did start to read Marnie on the train last night as I've been carrying it around with me for days.

Anyway, the strangest thing happened. After days of saying that I really didn't want to read it and would hate it, I started reading when I got on the train and the next time I looked up, I was at my stop, 40 mins later! That hasn't happened to me since the Poldarks. I'm really enjoying it!!!! :thumb: And that should see me through until the other two arrive and I can get started on them.

Once again, I'm reminded how lucky I am to be a reader. My husband isn't and takes months to read one book when he can be bothered. He's missing out on such a lot........... :roll:

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How many books did Winston Graham write?

Postby Jim50 » Wed Feb 18, 2004 6:49 am

As there seems to be some confusion concerning the extent of Winston Graham's literary output, outlined below is what I believe to be the definitive position:

(1) Novels of Winston Graham

During his lifetime, Mr Graham wrote and published 42 original novels, the first ten of which have been out of print for more than half a century. Two of this ten - The Giant's Chair (1938) and My Turn Next (1942) - were subsequently revised and republished under different titles: Woman In The Mirror (1975) and Cameo (1988) respectively. The plot of The Giant's Chair was retained but the narrative substantially pruned (from 314 pages down to 238). My Turn Next was written during World War II as a contemporary story and then, some four decades on, recast as a retrospective wartime tale whilst remaining essentially the same book.

It was soon after the War ended that Mr Graham took the decision not to republish any of his first ten novels, on the grounds that, in his opinion, none of them reached the high standard he had by then come to set himself as a writer. He considered them, in other words, mere apprentice work. For the remainder of his long life, he never subsequently altered this opinion nor would sanction republication of any of these ten books, for he believed that to sell them under his name would be to con his public into buying what he considered to be inferior product. Though such concern is laudible and seemingly quite typical of a very sincere and genuine man, the irony is that all ten of them make very enjoyable reading. Both The Giant's Chair and My Turn Next are significantly better books than the retreads they later became. Though the plot of his first book (The House With the Stained Glass Windows, published in 1934) is somewhat silly (madman in attic) it is still fascinating to discover that the author's deft handling of narrative and dialogue was present right from the off. In his memoirs, Mr Graham described another of these books - Strangers Meeting (1939) - as "the worst book I ever wrote" - but don't be misled. Though such opinions are inevitably subjective, artists are notoriously poor judges of their own work and Strangers Meeting is, if not great, still perfectly accessible fare. One of the more remarkable facets of Mr Graham's literary career is the extent to which his standard remained so uniformly high throughout. Very few of his books missed their mark. The book of his I've least enjoyed reading is Take My Life, and I didn't think too much of Stephanie or Cameo either. But still his canon is very large and, overall, exceptionally good. As for the ten early books, with patience (it took me six years!) and luck, copies can be found. I checked on ABE a few days ago and three of them - Without Motive (1936), Keys of Chance (1939) and My Turn Next - are there right now, though none are cheap. In my experience, The Giant's Chair, Strangers Meeting and No Exit (1940) are rare and Into The Fog (1935) is extremely rare, but good hunting if you go after them - you'll find it a rewarding journey.

But hang on a minute, you might cry, what about The Wreck Of The Grey Cat? What about The Renegade, Venture Once More or The Last Gamble? Surely there are rather more than 42 + 2 titles altogether? And indeed, all of the above titles are to be found on sale lists next to Mr Graham's name. But they are all books which, published in the UK under one title, were then published abroad under another title (those named above being The Forgotten Story, Ross Poldark, Jeremy Poldark and Warleggan respectively). Unfortunately, what they are not is more Winston Graham. There is a WG novel published in Germany in 1982 called Jennifer. Though I don't know which book this is, what is certain is that it's not another "missing" novel but merely one of those previously published elsewhere under a more familiar title. So, yes, there are more than 42 titles, but, sadly, by way of novels, 42 originals plus two re-writes is all there is.

(2) Short Stories

Other posts on this site refer to a title called The Cornish Farm and I must say at the outset that I'm not familiar with any such book. However, the eighth short story in The Japanese Girl (1971) is none other that The Cornish Farm and I would be prepared to bet that, if such a book exists at all, then The Cornish Farm will be a reprint of some or all of The Japanese Girl.

To the best of my knowledge, only 17 Winston Graham short stories have ever been published. These are the 14 contained in The Japanese Girl + The Circus (see Winter's Crimes Volume 6 (1975)) + Nothing In The Library (see Winter's Crimes Volume 19 (1987)) + The Horse Dealer (published on Ross Carter's Poldark website and elsewhere). I would be very interested to hear of any others, though suspect there are none.

(3) Non-fiction

In addition to the fiction titles referred to above, there are, of course, a small number of non-fiction titles credited to Mr Graham's name. To list or discuss these works falls beyond the scope of this short posting.

I hope the above proves helpful and happy reading!

Regards
Jim50

Update 2013: Find a comprehensive annotated Winston Graham bibliography here:

http://winstongraham.yolasite.com
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Updated List of Winstons Graham's Books - 22nd February

Postby David » Fri Feb 20, 2004 3:41 pm

Thanks indeed Jim50 !! :-) Very comprehensive and interesting reading !

I've quickly added all your kind information into this latest update list so please excuse any hurried typo errors, however I've definitely got something wrong somewhere as the final total of Novels comes to 45 ! Also I've counted the 18 separate Short stories as 3 in all, although I would have thought that perhaps each is a small book in it's own right ? I leave it to the expert !

Anyway it certainly sounds as though you've been a Winston fan for many years ! Problem is you raise almost as many interesting questions as you do answers :wink: !

So do you mind at all if I could ask a few....always speaking of course as a total beginner more than likely to start adding pretty soon to his treasured signed brand new autobiography, 1 26 year old good condition ex Exeter Library (30p!) Robin Ellis signed copy of Making Poldark, 12 Poldarks most very dog eared and second hand (2 Strangers from the Sea for some reason just gotta find The Loving Cup), Marnie, Greek Fire and The Forgotten Story and the full set of the BBC Videos....oh and 4 new Ottakar's publicity leaflets announcing last September's Autobiography signing ceremony in Truro for good measure !

Ok - I'm ready to be floored ! :-)

From the sound of it you've been a serious collector of Winston's books for quite some time ?

On the assumption therefore that you have....?

1. Can you remember your first Winston book purchase ? And when ?
2. And how many of the 42 (?) original novels do you now have ?
3. How many do you still need ? (If any !!)
4. Were you able to buy the rarer ones mostly say in the UK, the States etc....?
5. From what type of sources ?
6. What is your rarest book ?
7. And your most prized ?
8. Like any rare item prices can be high. So do you feel that Winston's earlier books in particular could start to rise in the near future meaning now is a good time to buy ?
9. Obviously you have a much valued collection so you will presumably have insured it ? How does one arrive at an acceptable insurance valuation ?
10. Would this be with a specialist firm of brokers or any firm ? And where ?
11. Any thoughts on how the Poldark series compare with the rest of his novels ?
12. Do you feel that the Poldark novels were as well written at the beginning as at the end ?
13. Do you have any specific date in time when you think his writing overall was at it's most outstanding, compelling and creative ? And any period when perhaps it was at it's least ?
14. And if so, any ideas what might have caused these two differences ?
15. Is it likely to be a difficult and long job to trace all his non-fiction ones in order to achieve a grand final total of all his published books ?
16. I would guess that Winston is your most favourite author ? Who would be your second one ?
17. Any advice, tips, do's and dont's etc. for budding Winston Graham book collectors ?
18. Do you need a copy of Stranger from the Sea ?

Tnanks in advance of course and sorry to be so curious !!! :-)

David

(Updated list of Books - 22nd February)

Novels

1. The House with the Stained Glass Windows - 1934
2. Into the Fog -1935 Extremely rare.
3. The Riddle of John Rowe -1935
4. Without Motive - 1936
5. The Dangerous Pawn -1937
6. The Giant's Chair -1938. Rare. ( Revised - Woman in the Mirror - 1975)
7. Keys of Chance -1939
8. Strangers Meeting - 1939. Rare.
9. No Exit - 1940
10. Night Journey - 1941
11. My Turn Next -1942. Rare. ( Revised - Cameo - 1988)
12.The Merciless Ladies - 1944
13. The Forgotten Story - 1945. (The Wreck of the Grey Cat - 1958)
14. Ross Poldark - (1783-1787) 1945
15. Demelza - (1788-1790) 1946
16. Take My Life - 1947
17. Cordelia - 1949
18. Night Without Stars - 1950
19 Jeremy Poldark - (1790-1791) 1950
20. Fortune Is A Woman - 1952
21. Warleggan - (1792-1793) 1953
22. The Little Walls -1955 (aka Bridge to Vengeance)
23. The Sleeping Partner - 1956
24. Greek Fire - 1957
25. The Tumbled House - 1959
26. Marnie - 1961
27. After the Act -1965
28. The Walking Stick - 1967
29. Angell, Pearl and Little God - 1970
30. The Grove of Eagles - 1970
31. The Black Moon - (1794-1795) 1973
32. Woman in the Mirror - 1975
33. The Four Swans - (1795-1797) 1976
34. The Angry Tide - (1789-1799) 1977
35. Stranger From The Sea - (1810-1811) 1981
36. The Millers Dance - (1812-1813) 1982
37. The Loving Cup - (1813-1815) 1984(?)
38. The Green Flash - 1986
39. Cameo - 1988
40. The Twisted Sword - (1815) 1991
41. Stephanie - 1992
42. Tremor - 1996
43 The Ugly Sister - 1998
44. Bella - (1818-1820) 2003

Short stories

45. 14 short stories 1975. Incl.The Japanese Girl (1971 ?) aka The Cornish Farm (reprint ?) - 1971, The Circus - see Winter's Crimes Volume 6 (1975)
46. At the Chalet Lartrec - 1971
47. The Basket Chair - ?
48. Nothing in the Library - 1987. 3 short stories - see Winter's Crimes Volume 19 (1987)
49.The Horse Dealer
- (Jennifer - re- named ? Published in Germany -1982)

Non- Fiction

50. Spanish Armadas - 1972
51. Poldark's Cornwall - 1983
52. Memoirs of a Private Man - 2003

Anthologies containing stories by Winston Graham

53. The 7th Fontana Book of Great Horror Stories - 1972
54. Realms of Darkness - 1985
55. The Mammoth Book of Twentieth Century Ghost Stories - 1998
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