GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Fri Jun 24, 2016 7:15 am

exhort
Pronunciation: /ɪɡˈzɔːt/
/ɛɡˈzɔːt/
verb
[with object and infinitive]
Strongly encourage or urge (someone) to do something: I exhorted her to be a good child [with direct speech]: ‘Come on, you guys,’ exhorted Linda

Origin
Late Middle English: from Old French exhorter or Latin exhortari, from ex- 'thoroughly' + hortari 'encourage'.

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--__--__--__--__--__--__--__--__--

I exhort all who read WotD to jump right in with a simple statement of some sort. Just write it. Click the Preview button if you must, but submit. Submit. Submit. Don't think too much about it. God knows I don't.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Fri Jun 24, 2016 12:56 pm

Algot Runeman wrote:exhort
Image

This exhortation is a fine example of "in one ear, out the other".

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Kahrey » Sat Jun 25, 2016 4:59 am

The image of my sister beaten and tied to a chair flashed in my mind and exhorted me to do it. Pull the trigger.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sat Jun 25, 2016 7:12 am

macchiato
Pronunciation: /ˌmakɪˈɑːtəʊ/
noun (plural macchiatos)
A drink of espresso coffee with a dash of frothy steamed milk.

Origin
From Italian (caffè) macchiato, literally 'stained, marked (coffee)', from macchiare 'mark, stain'.

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----=----=----=----=----=----

My macchiato was too hot and burned my lip. I twitched and the cup quivered in my grasp. A stain is now streaked down my tie, just in time for our morning meeting with the boss.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Sat Jun 25, 2016 10:50 am

Algot Runeman wrote:macchiato

Meeting the boss with a macchiato stain on your tie may well be considered a macho feat.

But only once. A repeat performance will not be received in the same spirit.

Also never mix Italian milk and Spanish coffee.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Sat Jun 25, 2016 7:55 pm

After your exhortation how could I not post something ?

Sometimes I'm happy with just a black expresso.
But If I feel like a more milky stuff, I'll ask for a full-fledged capuccino. Macchiato I don't care for.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sun Jun 26, 2016 7:51 am

demos

Pronunciation: /ˈdiːmɒs/
noun (plural demoi /ˈdiːmɔɪ/)
1 The common people of an ancient Greek state.
1.1 The populace of a democracy as a political unit.

Origin
From Greek dēmos.

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-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

It is gratifying that the demos who occupy (or just visit) this forum can gather to respond to occasional exhortations whether those people raise a cup of cappuchino, macchiato or a quaff of beverage alcoholic, mayhap a paper cup of water.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Sun Jun 26, 2016 8:42 am

Algot Runeman wrote:demos

Has anyone ever posted a demo of how to organise one or more demos?
(I mean demo as in demonstration.)

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Mon Jun 27, 2016 7:11 am

cote-hardie

Pronunciation: /ˈkəʊtˌhɑːdi/
noun (plural cote-hardies)
historical
A medieval close-fitting tunic with sleeves, worn by both sexes.

Origin
Middle English: from Old French, from cote 'coat' + hardie (feminine) 'bold'.

Image
via GlamourDaze

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

It came as very little surprise that today's word had not been used for WotD in the past. Well, actually, as a word, it was ONLY used in the past. Indeed, even the definition uses a passé word, tunic, to "help" us understand that the cote-hardie was a garment that all sorts of people wore in the Middle Ages. Of course, understanding fashion, which I don't, some might suggest that the style of cote-hardie has returned many times. It seems to me that the 1930s and 1940s may have resurrected the close-fitting coat which hung below the waist...though for women only. I don't think I've seen photos of men dressed in such a jacket. The closest I recall was the WWII military "Eisenhower" jacket which was close-fitting, but stopped at the waist. Maybe the Field Jacket (below right) "fits" the style.

ImageImage
via Wikipedia

All-in-all, the upshot for WotD is that it may be difficult to work cote-hardie into one's daily conversation. Sorry. Such is the way the game is played. LOL (New terms come along and old ones FADE.)
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Mon Jun 27, 2016 9:52 am

Algot Runeman wrote:cote-hardie

The retro fashion designer and his coterie all wore cote-hardies (the women) or greatcoats (the men).

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Mon Jun 27, 2016 10:12 am

E.P.S.,

Just what is it that makes a greatcoat so great? And what is so bold about the cote-hardie? And who is the wordsmith who changed the spelling of cote to coat?
So many questions. So few answers.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Mon Jun 27, 2016 11:43 am

Algot Runeman wrote:...
So many questions. So few answers.

Just what is it that makes a greatcoat so great?
Ul. Grant and Sh. Holmes wore one.

And what is so bold about the cote-hardie?
The retro models require a very tight corset.

And who is the wordsmith who changed the spelling of cote to coat?
John Watson?
To avoid confusion between cote-of-arms and côte à l'os (T-bone steak)?
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Tue Jun 28, 2016 7:12 am

lemma

Pronunciation: /ˈlɛmə/
noun (plural lemmas or lemmata /ˈlɛmətə/)
1 A subsidiary or intermediate theorem in an argument or proof: they give every last lemma of neoclassical theory the status of Holy Writ
2 A heading indicating the subject or argument of a literary composition or annotation.
3 A word or phrase defined in a dictionary or entered in a word list.

Origin
Late 16th century: via Latin from Greek lēmma 'something assumed'; related to lambanein 'take'.

-==-==-==-==-==-==-==-==-==-==-==-

"Lemmie alone!" cried Sally. "It's not fair. You all know more words than me."

That's no problem, Sally. Some of us are very old and have built up our word list by examining the lemmata of encyclopedias and dictionaries. We have read the words in context in novels and scientific literature along with the occasional political screed. We hope you will still share your word work play with us. We were once like you, fresh and untroubled by vocabulary beyond "cool" and "right on!" Who says those things any more? It's on to "LOL", "ROTFL" and "ICYMI". No, wait, that's not right. Today's lemma list is all about emoji.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Tue Jun 28, 2016 7:48 am

Algot Runeman wrote:lemma... Today's lemma list is all about emoji.

Isn't emoji singular, while the plural is emojiti?

How's that for a lemma (dilemma or dilemna?)

(I'm not sure about the pronunciation of emoji.
But http://howjsay.com/pronunciation-of-emoji confirmed my intuitive attempt.)
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Tue Jun 28, 2016 4:33 pm

When one hesitates between two options, it is said than one is placed in front of a dilemma.

But there are cases when one hesitates between three or more options (expresso, macciato, latte, capuccino...)
Why don't the words trilemma, tetralemma, pentalemma exist ?
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Wed Jun 29, 2016 7:49 am

cenobium

Pronunciation: /səˈnəʊbɪəm/
(also coenobium)
noun (plural cenobia /səˈnəʊbɪə/)
A monastery: many pilgrims flocked to the cenobium in search of the monk

Origin
Early 19th century: ecclesiastical Latin coenobium, from Greek koinobion 'community life, convent', from koinos 'common' + bios 'life'.

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

Sam sought the monks of Carlsbad Cenobium. He had heard that they had developed a remedy to repair synovial tissue. His knees were killing him so he could not kneel to pray.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Thu Jun 30, 2016 6:18 am

mumblecore

Pronunciation: /ˈmʌmb(ə)lkɔː/
noun
[mass noun]
A style of low-budget film typically characterized by the use of non-professional actors and naturalistic or improvised performances: an actor/filmmaker known for his cinematic experimentations with mumblecore [as modifier]: the mumblecore movement

Origin
Early 21st century: from mumble (probably with reference to the style of acting) + -core.

-=-=33=-=-

Clancy and Cindy used their uncle's new digital video camera to make a movie with some friends. Though they were not expecting it, they are on their way to fame. Their modest mumblecore caught critics and audience attention right away.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Thu Jun 30, 2016 7:54 am

Algot Runeman wrote:mumblecore

I guess we can consider ourselves lucky that the movies featuring Albus Dumbledore were no mumblecore!

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Fri Jul 01, 2016 6:12 am

grangerize

Pronunciation: /ˈɡreɪn(d)ʒərʌɪz/
(also grangerise)
verb
[with object] (usually as adjective grangerized)
Illustrate (a book) by later insertion of material, especially prints cut from other works: there were grangerized copies in the British Library

Origin
Late 19th century: from the name of James Granger (1723–76), English biographer.

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

This is the original, plain post, unedited.

Image

Now it has been edited and grangerized at the same time. Worse still, the added image has no particular connection with the word we consider today.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Sat Jul 02, 2016 8:08 am

Algot Runeman wrote:grangerize

This could also be said of a movie script written, adapted or grangerized to fit Stewart Granger.
I not only remember his character in North to Alaska, I have the movie on hard disk in HiDef.

Spoiler: show
(from L to R: the Duke, Stewart Granger, Capucine)

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sat Jul 02, 2016 8:57 am

perfin

Pronunciation: /ˈpəːfɪn/
noun
Philately
A postage stamp perforated with the initials or insignia of an organization, especially to prevent misuse.

Origin
1950s: from perf(orated) in(itials).

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

Sam sent the donation to his favorite charity. He had the choice of how much to send, but the envelope had a perfin stamp, so it would have been difficult to use for another purpose. He did hope that the foundation's IBS perforations didn't send the wrong message with the stamp they had chosen.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Sat Jul 02, 2016 1:31 pm

Algot Runeman wrote:perfin
... He did hope that the foundation's IBS perforations didn't send the wrong message ...

The IBS Foundation soon abandoned the perfin stamps.
The employee who punched the little perforations was much too expensive, because it was so enormously time-consuming to apply the little holes in each stamp.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sat Jul 02, 2016 2:08 pm

Perfin perfection, E.P.S. :clap:
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sun Jul 03, 2016 6:23 am

habile

Pronunciation: /ˈhabɪl/
adjective
rare
Deft; skilful.

Origin
Late Middle English: variant of able. The spelling change in the 16th and 17th cents was due to association with French habile and Latin habilis.

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

Henry was habile with cards. His shuffle was smooth and stylish. Unfortunately, his skills stopped when the dealing was done. His luck was awful and he could not bluff worth a bean.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Mon Jul 04, 2016 2:57 am

It never ceases to amaze me, Algot, how habile you are to find a perfect sentence to illustrate each WOTD.

And Sir E's habilily, though not as systematic, is never a mere grangerization.

I keep exhorting myself to follow your examples more often, but I seldom find an appropriate idea.
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