GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Mon Oct 26, 2015 1:48 pm

Algot Runeman wrote:succedaneum...
A substitute, especially for a medicine or drug.
...

This is confusing.

The few remnants of my Latin knowledge suggest that a succedaneum is something to immediately follow the actual medecine.
Something delicious to follow makes it easier to swallow some foul smelling or bad tasting potion. ♫ For a...
♫ Spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down
♫ The medicine go down-wown
♫ The medicine go down
♫ Just a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down
♫ In a most delightful way

It reminds me of the spoonful of godawful codfish oil (for the vitamin D) and the cup of fresh orange juice my mom used to administer when I was a kid.

To me, a succedaneum is not a substitute, but a consecutive second step.

There's also a professional memory:
1. a simultaneous impression, a one-step impression with two distinct impression materials
2. a succedaneous impression, a two-step impression with a single or with two impression compounds

This a simultaneous impression.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Mon Oct 26, 2015 3:41 pm

This is confusing.


Your sense of the word's origin seems right to me, E.P.S. To "succeed" can also mean follow, as in the succession of kings.

In the case of this word, it's lack of regular use might be why it has an off-key meaning. (Your spoonful of sugar was beautifully done, by the way.)

It has apparently sneaked into its corner usage and hasn't enjoyed the subsequent modification that is so common in well-used words. Maybe it was even misapplied in some early professional work and then just got repeated again and again in later papers.

I've always been bothered that "methodology" has been taken to mean "methods" instead of the "study of methods." Expert, (copycat?) usage has driven the current use.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Tue Oct 27, 2015 6:54 am

anterograde

Pronunciation: /ˈantərəʊɡreɪd/
adjective
1 Directed forwards in time.
1.1 Of or denoting a form of amnesia which involves inability to remember information encountered after its onset.

Origin
Late 19th century: from anterior, on the pattern of retrograde.

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While anterograde amnesia is certainly a serious problem, it makes me think of not being able to remember the score of tomorrow's baseball game.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Tue Oct 27, 2015 8:39 am

Algot Runeman wrote:anterograde...
While anterograde amnesia is certainly a serious problem, it makes me think of not being able to remember the score of tomorrow's baseball game.

If you won't be able to remember the score of tomorrow's baseball game after watching the basketball game, don't worry. There's nothing anterograde about that.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Tue Oct 27, 2015 11:06 am

I was too subtle. I meant that TODAY, I was not going to remember tomorrow's score. It probably was, or will be, a bad joke either way.

I present this for your consideration: Give yourself a present, be present in the present.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Wed Oct 28, 2015 7:37 am

bork

Pronunciation: /ˈbɔːk/
verb
[with object] US informal
Obstruct (someone, especially a candidate for public office) by systematically defaming or vilifying them: ‘We’re going to bork him’, warned a feminist (as noun borking) is fear of borking scaring people from public office?

Origin
1980s: from the name of Robert Bork (1927–2012), an American judge whose nomination to the Supreme Court (1987) was rejected following unfavourable publicity for his allegedly extreme views.

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He's borked. Stick a fork in him. He's done. No need to run.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Wed Oct 28, 2015 8:39 am

Algot Runeman wrote:bork

John McEnroe tried to bork Björn (the Borg) Borg from winning. Sometimes he succeded, sometimes not. On the court they were well matched to each other.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Thu Oct 29, 2015 8:33 am

fideism

Pronunciation: /ˈfʌɪdɪɪz(ə)m/
noun
[mass noun]
The doctrine that knowledge depends on faith or revelation.

Origin
Late 19th century: from Latin fides 'faith' + -ism.

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After stepping out of the church doors on Sunday, John crossed the street, strong in the faith that God was watching over him. His fideism let him down. The truck driver didn't see him step out between the cars in time to stop.

Confronting St. Peter at the gate, John asked, "What am I doing here?"
St. Peter Looked up from his book of expected arrivals. "Free will, John. God watches over you, but it was your choice to cross in the middle of the street. Faith doesn't overcome careless individual stupidity. The good news is that you are here, entering heaven instead of hell because of your absolute faith. Don't worry about your wife and nine children. God will watch over them."

[Irreverent tale for illustrative purposes only. Your experience may vary.]
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Fri Oct 30, 2015 8:02 am

mischievous

Line breaks: mis¦chiev|ous
Pronunciation: /ˈmɪstʃɪvəs/
adjective
1 Causing or showing a fondness for causing trouble in a playful way: mischievous children a mischievous grin
2 (Of an action or statement) causing or intended to cause harm or trouble: a mischievous allegation for which there is not a shred of evidence

Origin
Middle English: from Anglo-Norman French meschevous, from Old French meschever 'come to an unfortunate end' (see mischief). The early sense was 'unfortunate or calamitous', later 'having harmful effects'; the sense 'playfully troublesome' dates from the late 17th century.

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I don't want to wreck your day.
Do not wish to cause you harm.
If I punch you in the arm.
It is 'cause I want to play.

"Mischievous Mike" they all say.
When I'm only trying to charm.
I hope you've set your alarm.
Ready to begin today.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Fri Oct 30, 2015 8:36 am

When I see a new WOTD, I always try to think of some funny, even mischievous response. Alas, I am not very good at that, unless I can somehow find a connection EPS's mischievous Grandma.

PS: I have known this word for many years,but somehow I was convinced that it was sounded, and spelled mischievious. Thanks for correcting me, Algot !
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Fri Oct 30, 2015 11:52 am

Algot Runeman wrote:mischievous
voralfred wrote:...
EPS's mischievous Grandma ...
PS: I have known this word for many years, ...

Of course you do, you *are* too ... Image

All kidding aside, there's a nifty trick to check the correct the spelling of English words, not mischievous at all.

Open a Google search page and in the search entry box type the word followed by "meaning". That gives you the correct spelling and an explanation too.

Example: Google for (without the quotes) "mischievous meaning" and see the result here.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Fri Oct 30, 2015 1:39 pm

Funny is not an expectation here. Silly is good enough.

Sincere is super. Structurally sound is sufficient.

And there was an interesting result above several definition links when I tried to follow the E.P.S. "meaning" link.

Image

Is this a Belgian Boondoggle, a trick played on us foreign folk?

When I typed the "mischeivous meaning" in the search for myself, I got something I was ready for.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Sat Oct 31, 2015 6:52 am

Algot Runeman wrote:...
Is this a Belgian Boondoggle, a trick played on us foreign folk?
...

Hm ...
I think it's a Googdoggle:
The link I mentioned sent you to Google.be/and-so-forth .

I wonder what Voralfred will get to see. Of course it may depend on where in the world he is at that time. But if he's at home in Paris, I guess he'll see something analogous to your view on his Google.fr page.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sat Oct 31, 2015 12:13 pm

mwahahaha

Pronunciation: /ˈmwɑːhɑːhɑːhɑː/
(also muahahaha, bahahaha)
exclamation
informal
Used to represent laughter, especially triumphal or cackling laughter such as that uttered by a villainous character in a cartoon or comic strip: World domination, at last, is at hand. Mwahahaha!

Origin
1980s: imitative, on the pattern of ha ha.

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I'm never sure if I simply sound immature when I do a Halloween "Mwahahaha!"
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Sat Oct 31, 2015 1:31 pm

Algot Runeman wrote:mwahahaha
...
I'm never sure if I simply sound immature when I do a Halloween "Mwahahaha!"

Not so much immature, but definitely risible.

(I don't fully understand it, but it sounds good.)
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Sat Oct 31, 2015 1:49 pm

E Pericoloso Sporgersi wrote:
Algot Runeman wrote:...
Is this a Belgian Boondoggle, a trick played on us foreign folk?
...

Hm ...
I think it's a Googdoggle:
The link I mentioned sent you to Google.be/and-so-forth .

I wonder what Voralfred will get to see. Of course it may depend on where in the world he is at that time. But if he's at home in Paris, I guess he'll see something analogous to your view on his Google.fr page.


Well, when one follows a link, one gets exactly the same thing wherever one is in the world; I also got the belgian site, just what Algot got.

On the other hand, if I type "mischievous meaning" (without quotes) even though it is indeed google.fr that is activated, except for the Googdoggle, I get a list of sites *in english* with a very large overlap with those on the belgian site below the Googdoggle, up to the order (probably those which appear on one site and not the other on page one *will* appear on page 2 but I did not check)
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sun Nov 01, 2015 9:47 am

kinesics

Pronunciation: /kɪˈniːsɪks/
/kʌɪˈniːsɪks/
plural noun
[usually treated as singular]
1 The study of the way in which certain body movements and gestures serve as a form of non-verbal communication.
1.1 [usually treated as plural] Body movements and gestures regarded as a form of non-verbal communication.

Origin
1950s: from Greek kinēsis 'motion' (from kinein 'to move') + -ics.

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Though it is not a worldwide kinesics gesture, "Thumbs Up" generally represents, in English-speaking cultures, non-verbal approval or sometimes, "I'm okay!".

[According to Wikipedia, there are countries where the gesture is pejorative and careless use should be avoided.]
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Sun Nov 01, 2015 12:19 pm

Algot Runeman wrote:kinesics

My grandma had her own furry kinesics.
It was a very simple gesture language though. It had only three expressions: furs ON, furs OFF and, for grandpa's eyes only, furs OPEN. :D

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Mon Nov 02, 2015 10:25 am

semiotics

Pronunciation: /ˌsiːmɪˈɒtɪks/
/ˌsɛmɪˈɒtɪks/
plural noun
[treated as singular]
The study of signs and symbols and their use or interpretation.

Origin
Late 19th century: from Greek sēmeiotikos 'of signs', from sēmeioun 'interpret as a sign'.

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Bob knew he was in trouble with his college major in semiotics when he first walked up to his advisor's office door.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Mon Nov 02, 2015 11:12 am

kinesics is one of the branch of semiotics

Maybe EPS would care to elaborate on the semiotics interpretation of
EPS wrote:furs ON, furs OFF and furs OPEN

?
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Mon Nov 02, 2015 12:03 pm

voralfred wrote:kinesics is one of the branch of semiotics Maybe EPS would care to elaborate on the semiotics interpretation of
EPS wrote:furs ON, furs OFF and furs OPEN
?

Down, you lecher, this is a family forum!

Even though grandpa didn't know one Ιώτα of semiotics, he had an intuitive and thorough understanding of grandma's kinesics.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Mon Nov 02, 2015 10:48 pm

E Pericoloso Sporgersi wrote:Down, you lecher, this is a family forum!


And, as they say
Thersites wrote:Fry, lechery, fry!


But I was just trying to be mischievous :twisted:

mwahahaha
:lol:
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Tue Nov 03, 2015 7:57 am

veepstakes

Pronunciation: /ˈviːpsteɪks/
noun
[treated as singular or plural] US informal
The notional competition among politicians to be chosen as a party’s candidate for vice president: is the Oklahoma governor a front runner in the veepstakes? with the presidential nominations assured, the veepstakes have begun

Origin
1960s: from veep and sweepstake.

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All the veepstakes "candidates" met in Iowa to eat beefsteak and then some cheesecake. They knew it was a silly mistake, just like the word.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Wed Nov 04, 2015 7:32 am

empennage

Pronunciation: /ɛmˈpɛnɪdʒ/
noun
Aeronautics
An arrangement of stabilizing surfaces at the tail of an aircraft.

Origin
Early 20th century: from French, from empenner 'to feather an arrow', from em- 'in' + penne 'a feather' (from Latin penna).

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Airplane empennage has had many variations. One might even say the design of tail stability has been unstable.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Wed Nov 04, 2015 8:34 am

Algot Runeman wrote:empennage
Image

IMHO that Constellation is very retro, but still quite good-looking.

On the other hand the empennage on many 1950's american cars was downright ridiculous.

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Remember the not-so-extreme Tatra aerodynamic car? It had one single dorsal fin.

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