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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Sun Jul 26, 2015 11:04 am
by E Pericoloso Sporgersi
Algot Runeman wrote:literatim...
I wonder if literatim monastic duplication required actual literacy or merely precise, dexterous penmanship.

It only required verbatim disks on a stick, i.e. a literatim digital storage medium.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Mon Jul 27, 2015 7:32 am
by Algot Runeman
stanza

Pronunciation: /ˈstanzə/
noun
1 A group of lines forming the basic recurring metrical unit in a poem; a verse.
1.1 A group of four lines in some Greek and Latin metres.

Origin
Late 16th century: from Italian, literally 'standing place', also 'stanza'.

============= ============= ============= =============

A poet stands a
Lot of life, gazing
At the world, a
Frail home, phasing.

The second stanza
Of the rhyme
Holds togetha
But little time.

The third today
At last we see
The point in play:
Just rhyme quite free.

-------------------- Bonus?

There was an actor
Named Tony Danza
His career, we'll factor
Is worth one stanza.

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Mon Jul 27, 2015 8:53 am
by E Pericoloso Sporgersi
Algot Runeman wrote:stanza
...
There was an actor
Named Tony Danza
His career, we'll factor
Is worth one stanza.

This illustrates the Swedish stance about the Italian stanza. Image

Do I get the bonus?

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Mon Jul 27, 2015 12:23 pm
by Algot Runeman
E.P.S. wrote:Do I get the bonus?


You get the bonus, the gold medal, the "major prize."

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Tue Jul 28, 2015 6:51 am
by Algot Runeman
buffo

Pronunciation: /ˈbʊfəʊ/
noun (plural buffos)
A comic actor in Italian opera.
adjective
Of or typical of Italian comic opera: a buffo character

Origin
Mid 18th century: Italian, 'puff of wind, buffoon', from buffare 'to puff', of imitative origin.

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Western University

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After leaving a successful career in Italian opera, Carlo retained his buffo character by becoming a stand-up comic.

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Tue Jul 28, 2015 7:28 am
by E Pericoloso Sporgersi
Algot Runeman wrote:buffo

They were three deep jostling at the table, stretching the length the ball room.

Nevertheless the stubborn buffo buffeted his way through the usual buffoons before they cleared the choicest tidbits from the buffet counter.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Tue Jul 28, 2015 9:21 am
by Algot Runeman
E.P.S. wrote:Nevertheless the stubborn buffo buffeted his way through the usual buffoons before they cleared the choicest tidbits from the buffet counter.
:clap:

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Tue Jul 28, 2015 11:56 am
by voralfred
Well, in the same vein:

Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo.


This is not mine, of course, but (after spending some time reading the explanations) I am now able to parse this sentence correctly.

It is easier with both capitals and lower case than if you write it all in capitals (or if you jsut hear it..!)

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Wed Jul 29, 2015 9:06 am
by Algot Runeman
pteridology

Pronunciation: /ˌtɛrɪˈdɒlədʒi/
noun
[mass noun]
The study of ferns and related plants.

Origin
Mid 19th century: from Greek pteris, pterid- 'fern' + -logy.

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J Brew

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Vern studies ferns. He also studies club mosses. His passion is pteridology. Brushing through the bracken is a pleasure all by itself, but also because those in the know, like him, know the genus is Pteridium.

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Wed Jul 29, 2015 1:02 pm
by voralfred
And I thougth that pteridology was the study of flying reptiles, like pterodactlys and pteranodons...

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Wed Jul 29, 2015 5:42 pm
by Algot Runeman
Pterible misconceptions are always welcome!

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Thu Jul 30, 2015 7:21 am
by E Pericoloso Sporgersi
Algot Runeman wrote:Pterible misconceptions are always welcome!

It took me a while to realise that native English speakers have no speach impediment.

In Dutch the Pees preceding the Tees and the Esses are not silent at all, but clearly pronounced.

So if you English speaking people want to make yourselves understood in the Benelux, you'd better start sounding off the Pee.

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Thu Jul 30, 2015 7:58 am
by Algot Runeman
incrassate

Pronunciation: /ɪnˈkraseɪt/
adjective
rare
Thickened in form or consistency.

Origin
Late 15th century: from late Latin incrassatus 'made thick', past participle of incrassare.

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Matthew in Boston

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Isaac stood by the incrassate river, which the locals described as "too thick to drink; too thin to plow." It reminded him of his morning bowl of oatmeal. Isaac feared he would never want his beloved porridge again.

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Thu Jul 30, 2015 9:53 am
by E Pericoloso Sporgersi
Algot Runeman wrote:incrassate
...
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...
Isaac feared he would never want his beloved porridge again.

GREEN porridge?

How crass!

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Fri Jul 31, 2015 9:32 am
by Algot Runeman
Sothic

Pronunciation: /ˈsəʊθɪk/
/ˈsɒθɪk/
adjective
Relating to Sirius (the Dog Star), especially with reference to the ancient Egyptian year fixed by its heliacal rising.

Origin
Early 19th century: from Greek Sōthis (from an Egyptian name of the Dog Star) + -ic.

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DianaSprinkle.com

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You have trouble with green porridge? I suppose you never had "green eggs and ham, Sam-I-am" either. (So Seuss me!)

Let's get Sirius, everyone. The river was so thick that you might believe you could walk across the top. The Dog Star reflected from its surface in spite of being as thick as porridge (green or otherwise). That only happens once in a blue moon (which occurs tonight). If the moon is too bright, we'll have serious trouble seeing Sirius, a Sothic reflection, on the river.

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Fri Jul 31, 2015 11:59 am
by E Pericoloso Sporgersi
Algot Runeman wrote:Sothic
... green porridge? ... green eggs and ham...
... porridge (green or otherwise) ... in a blue moon ...

It's a good thing I don't have daltonism.

Otherwise all your sothistry would be wasted on me.

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Sun Aug 02, 2015 7:13 am
by Algot Runeman
Gemütlichkeit

Pronunciation: /ɡəˈmuːtlɪxkʌɪt/
/ɡəˈmyːtlɪçkaɪt/
noun
[mass noun]
Geniality; friendliness.

Origin
German.

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Count Liszt was always welcome at gatherings of society. His consistent Gemütlichkeit made everyone rise to his standard, leaving petty bickering at home.

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Sun Aug 02, 2015 10:13 am
by E Pericoloso Sporgersi
Algot Runeman wrote:Gemütlichkeit
...
Count Liszt was always welcome at gatherings of society. His consistent Gemütlichkeit made everyone rise to his standard, leaving petty bickering at home.

It was especially Franz's expert virtuosity at the piano (not the Count's), that made him the darling of bourgeois and anarchist alike.

It was only the lack of a piano that could preclude spontaneous Gemütlichkeit.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 7:01 am
by Algot Runeman
ostinato

Pronunciation: /ˌɒstɪˈnɑːtəʊ/
noun (plural ostinatos or ostinati ˌɒstɪˈnɑːti)
A continually repeated musical phrase or rhythm: [as modifier]: the cellos have the tune, above an ostinato bass figure

Origin
Italian, literally 'obstinate'.

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I was going to be obstinate about it, finding another word, but then I read the definition. My strong opinion is that there is vastly too much use of repeated phrases in modern US music. It's as if there is no verse to sing, only a seemingly endless ostinato of the chorus. "We are young, gonna set the world on fire" (Janelle Monáe) will, with luck, not be played 12 times on our local "most variety" music station during the daylight hours.

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Tue Aug 04, 2015 7:00 am
by Algot Runeman
reposado

Pronunciation: /ˌrɛpɒˈsɑːdəʊ/
noun
[mass noun] (plural reposados)
A type of tequila which has been aged in oak for between two months and a year.

Origin
Spanish, literally 'rested'.

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mallix

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Long after others had risen from siesta, Ronaldo reposed, rested and relaxed. It was his habit. It was a very easy habit to maintain because he habitually drank reposado in the afternoon, sometimes in the morning, too.

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Tue Aug 04, 2015 9:35 am
by E Pericoloso Sporgersi
Algot Runeman wrote:reposado

These days, with the heat, I'm having a reposado sostenuto, every day after lunch.

A sustained siesta, if you will, or, as we say in Flemish, I catch a little owl.

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Tue Aug 04, 2015 1:44 pm
by Algot Runeman
E.P.S wrote:catch a little owl


Now there's an idiom I like!

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2015 8:03 am
by Algot Runeman
gainsay

Pronunciation: /ɡeɪnˈseɪ/
verb (past and past participle gainsaid /ɡeɪnˈsed/)
[with object, with negative] formal
1 Deny or contradict (a fact or statement): the impact of the railways cannot be gainsaid

Origin
Middle English: from obsolete gain- 'against' + say.

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In all, they've learned a lot.
You'll gainsay, I will not.
Your gameplay is a plot
To ruin their rep, you snot!

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Thu Aug 06, 2015 5:56 am
by Algot Runeman
colloquium

Pronunciation: /kəˈləʊkwɪəm/
noun (plural colloquiums or colloquia kəˈləʊkwɪə)
An academic conference or seminar.

Origin
Late 16th century (denoting a conversation): from Latin, from colloqui 'to converse', from col- 'together' + loqui 'to talk'.

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Charlie was loco after attending his first colloquium. He expected more conversation, but got more "I talk; you listen." The challenge wasn't understanding the information, it was staying awake.

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Thu Aug 06, 2015 9:47 am
by E Pericoloso Sporgersi
Algot Runeman wrote:colloquium

My grandma too didn't much like most academic colloquia.

She thought the lack of easily understood colloquialism very deplorable.

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