GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Mon Jan 05, 2015 9:44 am

Algot Runeman wrote:ontology
...

...

I have the distinct impression that somewhere in there Paul McCartney sang "Let It Beard, Let It Beard ...".

Of course, ontologically it makes no difference, they broke up anyway ...
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Tue Jan 06, 2015 7:45 am

mahoosive

Pronunciation: /məˈhuːsɪv /
adjective
British informal
Exceptionally big; huge: you don’t need a mahoosive bag for a night out the screen is mahoosive

Origin
1990s: probably a blend of massive and a phonetic respelling of the first letters of huge.

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Carla carried a mahoosive purse everywhere. The significant thing was not actually its size, but the fact that she carried only a small wallet and a tube of lipstick in it.

[My sister-in-law uses the mix of "gigantic" and "enormous" as ginormous all the time here in the US. ODO says ginormous has been around since the 1940s, originating as military slang.]
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Wed Jan 07, 2015 9:17 am

fructify

Pronunciation: /ˈfrʌktɪfʌɪ /
verb (fructifies, fructifying, fructified)
[with object] formal
1 Make (something) fruitful or productive: they were sacrificed in order that their blood might fructify the crops
1.1 [no object] Bear fruit or become productive: it fructified like vegetation in steamy heat

Origin
Middle English: from Old French fructifier, from Latin fructificare, from fructus 'fruit'.

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Authors nominally spend time eavesdropping at the sidewalk café to accumulate details of life with which they fructify their writings. Actually, they sit there because they like drinking coffee and watching pretty girls go by.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Thu Jan 08, 2015 7:52 am

boodle

Pronunciation: /ˈbuːd(ə)l /
noun
[mass noun] informal
Money, especially that gained or spent illegally or improperly: he spent $30 million of his own boodle trying to buy a Senate seat

Origin
early 17th century (denoting a pack or crowd): from Dutch boedel, boel 'possessions, disorderly mass'. Compare with caboodle.

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It came into John's noodle
That he should grab his boodle
Stick it in a bundle
And from town he'd trundle.

The lawmen were too near now.
Surrounded by their gear, wow!
Rough justice they'd tender,
Forcing his surrender.

Though he was without leisure,
He buried deep his treasure.
Much after his demise,
Another'd find the prize.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Fri Jan 09, 2015 11:34 am

anagnorisis

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

n. The moment in the plot of a drama in which the hero makes a discovery that explains previously unexplained events or situations.
from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
n. The unraveling of a plot in dramatic action; dénouement; clearing up.

Examples

If I recall correctly, anagnorisis was in Aristotle's Poetics the "recognition" of a tragic hero that leads to his downfall, the classic example being Oedipus's recognition that he married his mother.

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You can't actually call the revelation that this word is from Wordnik an anagnorisis. There have not been any clues left earlier, though ODO has been the word/definition source for a long time. These posts generally don't develop much plot to be cleared up.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sat Jan 10, 2015 10:27 am

acrospire

Definitions
from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

n. The sprout at the end of a seed when it begins to germinate.
from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
v. To throw out the first leaf; sprout.

Examples
When the acrospire has shot but half the length of the grain, the lower part only is converted into that mellow saccharine flour we are solicitous of, whilst the other half exhibits no other signs of it than the whole kernel did at its first germination: let it advance to two thirds of the length, and the lower end will not only have increased its saccharine flavour, but will have proportionably extended its bulk, so as to have left one third part unmalted.
The American Practical Brewer and Tanner

This, or even less than this, is contended for by many maltsters, as a sufficient advance of the acrospire, which, they say, has done its business, so soon as it has passed the middle of the kernel.
The American Practical Brewer and Tanner

Note
The word 'acrospire' may come from Scots.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sun Jan 11, 2015 9:56 am

hypothesis

Pronunciation: /hʌɪˈpɒθɪsɪs /
noun (plural hypotheses /-siːz/)
1 A supposition or proposed explanation made on the basis of limited evidence as a starting point for further investigation: his ‘steady state’ hypothesis of the origin of the universe
1.1 Philosophy A proposition made as a basis for reasoning, without any assumption of its truth: [with clause]: the hypothesis that every event has a cause

Origin
late 16th century: via late Latin from Greek hupothesis 'foundation', from hupo 'under' + thesis 'placing'.

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I have the following hypothesis. The source of the day's word does not matter to the thousands of WotD visitors. The only certainty is that the word should not be a repeat.

[Nobody complained about the words from Wordnik. Then again, nobody cheered either.]
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Sun Jan 11, 2015 2:12 pm

You clearly have a sound scientific approach to test a hypothesis.

- make an experiment (namely : get several words from Wordnik instead of ODO)
- measure the result (namely : nobody complained, and nobody cheered either)
- check that it is compatible with your hypothesis (it is indeed)

Still this does not prove that your hypothesis is correct.
In particular, your hypothesis postulates that WotD has thousands of visitors. Nothing in this experiment gives access to this number. You'll need to perform more experiments in order to test that part of your hypothesis.
There is, however, an anagnorisis : WotD has at least one visitor (namely : me). It is a step in the right direction !
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Mon Jan 12, 2015 8:05 am

skerry

Pronunciation: /ˈskɛri /
noun (plural skerries)
Scottish
A reef or rocky island.

Origin
early 17th century: Orkney dialect, from Old Norse sker.

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Let Ideas Compete

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Handsome Hamish
Blushing Màiri
Took the skiff
To see the skerry.

Changing tide
Wave-splashed ride
Visit short
Way too scary.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Tue Jan 13, 2015 8:32 am

stupefy

Pronunciation: /ˈstjuːpɪfʌɪ /
verb (stupefies, stupefying, stupefied)
[with object]
1 Make (someone) unable to think or feel properly: the offence of administering drugs to a woman with intent to stupefy her
1.1 Astonish and shock: the amount they spend on clothes would appal their parents and stupefy their grandparents

Origin
late Middle English: from French stupéfier, from Latin stupefacere, from stupere 'be struck senseless'.

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I often try to stupefy the stupid fly before I grab the swatter.
I feel too silly if I stand and swing around my head at the buzzing pest.
My grandfather used to smoke cigars and used their smoke to help
But I don't smoke and so must use another way to trick the fly to rest.

[Please note that the spelling in the US is "appall" and it was ODO which supplied the example, and misspelling, in the 1.1 definition.]
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Tue Jan 13, 2015 9:37 am

Algot Runeman wrote:stupefy

Stipulated that J. K. Rowling is British, then "stupefy" is not your average rawling.

No, it's been machined and polished to be straightforward Graingerish if not Hogwartsish.

With my mind's eye, I can hear Hermione utter that spell with precise articulation and the swish of her confidant wand waving.

Though I shall not try to cast it here. We don't want the WotD to end, do we? That would be too apalling.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Wed Jan 14, 2015 8:52 am

pasquinade

Pronunciation: /ˌpaskwɪˈneɪd /
noun
A satire or lampoon, originally one displayed or delivered in a public place: he delivered a long pasquinade at the expense of my friend

Origin
late 16th century: from Italian pasquinata, from Pasquino, the name of a statue in Rome on which abusive Latin verses were posted annually.

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boris doesborg

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While others kept watch, he successively scrawled several scurrilous pasquinades on the wall. Of course, good citizen that he was, he used water-soluble paint so the first rain would clear the space for the next group.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Wed Jan 14, 2015 9:49 am

Algot Runeman wrote:pasquinade

Take care not to confuse pasquinade with culinary terms!

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Thu Jan 15, 2015 9:11 am

agnate

Definitions
from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
adj. Related or akin by the father's side; also, sprung from the same male ancestor.
n. A relative whose relationship can be traced exclusively through males.

Examples
Thus the son of your father's sister is no agnate of yours, but merely your cognate, and vice versa; for children are member's of their father's family, and not of your mother's.
The Institutes of Justinian

Assuming, as seems probable, that Ollantay was a son of the chief of Anta, he would be a cousin of the Inca, and of very high rank, though not an agnate of the reigning family.
Apu Ollantay A Drama of the Time of the Incas

Note
The word 'agnate' comes from a Latin word meaning 'to be born'.

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I Am Ming

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Benson was an agnate of the great Henry Ford. He had known his famous grandfather well. But Henry the second was naturally the more recognized of the sons of Edsel.

[The second definition got me wondering. Can a family relationship be traced exclusively through mails?]
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Thu Jan 15, 2015 1:20 pm

Algot Runeman wrote:agnate

Somebody should have carefully explained agnate to my grandpa's brother's grandson.

He used to bully me because I was (he said) his agnape.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Fri Jan 16, 2015 7:31 am

leitmotif

Pronunciation: /ˈlʌɪtməʊˌtiːf /
(also leitmotiv)
noun
A recurrent theme throughout a musical or literary composition, associated with a particular person, idea, or situation: there are two leitmotifs in his score marking the heroine and her Fairy Godmother

Origin
late 19th century: from German Leitmotiv, from leit- 'leading' (from leiten 'to lead') + Motiv 'motive'.

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tutincommon

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The leitmotif of these regular words of the day is an attempt to make stuffy words less so, archaic words accessible and harsh words light. Language is loved here, but with a wink and grin. :wink: :D
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sat Jan 17, 2015 9:20 am

anagram

Pronunciation: /ˈanəɡram /
noun
A word, phrase, or name formed by rearranging the letters of another, such as spar, formed from rasp.

Origin
late 16th century: from French anagramme or modern Latin anagramma, from Greek ana- 'back, anew' + gramma 'letter'.

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Al's gramma, Anna, was from Alabama. She moved as a child and lost her southern accent, substituting midwestern twang for her childhood drawl. She was fascinated by her father's skill while working in the shipyards, finishing the schooners' spars with giant rasps. Her stories told to Al, full of rasp and spar, eerie stories of Lake Erie, drunken sailing masters, swearing longshormen, the sweating black gang down in the bunker, cemented two things for him. He knew he loved words, especially anagrams thanks to Gramma Anna, and he wasn't going to ever be involved in shipping on the Great Lakes.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Sat Jan 17, 2015 10:55 am

Algot Runeman wrote:anagram
... A word, phrase, or name formed by rearranging the letters of another, such as spar, formed from rasp.
...
... stories told to Al, full of rasp and spar, eerie stories of Lake Erie, drunken sailing masters, swearing longshormen, the sweating black gang down in the bunker ...

and in the gym's practice ring, his sparring partner's rasping voice.

Oh, wait, that's not quite right ...
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sun Jan 18, 2015 8:55 am

peevish

Pronunciation: /ˈpiːvɪʃ /
adjective
Having or showing an irritable disposition: a thin peevish voice

Origin
late Middle English (in the sense 'perverse, coy'): of unknown origin.

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"Positively peevish!"
He had only three fish.
So feelings were bad.
Worst catch he'd had.

Most days a champ,
Best in the camp
Now face those chumps
He'd take his lumps.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Mon Jan 19, 2015 9:04 am

coterie

Pronunciation: /ˈkəʊt(ə)ri /
noun (plural coteries)
A small group of people with shared interests or tastes, especially one that is exclusive of other people: a coterie of friends and advisers

Origin
early 18th century: from French, earlier denoting an association of tenants, based on Middle Low German kote 'cote'.

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James Butler

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The coterie met at the haberdashery as an inside joke because their town did not have a coat-ery. Though they cared nothing for Stetsons or Hamburgs, their regular Saturday meetings did "cap off" the week.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Tue Jan 20, 2015 8:21 am

toft

Pronunciation: /tɒft/
noun
British historical
A homestead.

Origin
Old English, from Old Norse topt.

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Gary Troughton

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Miss Muffet who sat on a tuffet was able to eat her curds and whey because her family not only had a toft, but also a cow. It wasn't a large holding, but it was theirs, free and clear, handed down from one Muffet to another through ten generations.

[ noun - Law: A dwelling house with outbuildings and land assigned to its use.] another definition with another source language (French)
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Tue Jan 20, 2015 7:49 pm

Algot Runeman wrote:toft

Jim had had enough of farming.

He sold his toft, lock, stock and barrel.

He now lives in a loft.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Wed Jan 21, 2015 8:19 am

tittle

Pronunciation: /ˈtɪt(ə)l /
noun
[in singular]
A tiny amount or part of something: the rules have not been altered one jot or tittle since

Origin
late Middle English: from Latin titulus (see title), in medieval Latin 'small stroke, accent'; the phrase jot or tittle is from Matt. 5:18.

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I'm just going to jot this down.
Tim tattled about why the carriage rattled, "Burt loosened a bolt just a little. He also whittled around the nut after sharpening his knife with spittle."
There, I've jotted about the tittle.
Do you think Tim's tattle about the rattle was idle prattle, or was it enough to start a big battle?
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Wed Jan 21, 2015 9:22 am

Algot Runeman wrote:tittle

Though that tale is just tittle, your tattletale caught me speechless.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Wed Jan 21, 2015 1:48 pm

Amazingly, because of E.P.S. using "tattletale", I just realized I'd engaged in "tittle-tattle while actually using both words of that union separately and telling a tale of one who tattled.

Now I'm really rattled.
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