GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sat Jul 19, 2014 7:03 am

callow

Pronunciation: /ˈkalō /
adjective
(Especially of a young person) inexperienced and immature: earnest and callow undergraduates

Origin
Old English calu 'bald'; probably from Latin calvus 'bald'. This was extended to mean 'unfledged', which led to the present sense 'immature'.

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There was a boy named Quallo
Who was recognized as callow.
He thought himself real deep
But was, for sure, quite shallow.
Words are a game. Sometimes I play alone, but you are welcome to play, too.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sun Jul 20, 2014 6:24 am

acrid

Pronunciation: /ˈakrid /
adjective
1 Having an irritatingly strong and unpleasant taste or smell: acrid fumes
1.1 Angry and bitter: an acrid farewell

Origin
early 18th century: formed irregularly from Latin acer, acri- 'sharp, pungent' + -id1, probably influenced by acid.

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Acrid in her scent,
On perfume she had not spent.
Acid personality
Living alone came naturally.
Words are a game. Sometimes I play alone, but you are welcome to play, too.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Mon Jul 21, 2014 9:02 am

asperity

Pronunciation: /əˈsperitē /
noun (plural asperities)
1 Harshness of tone or manner: he pointed this out with some asperity
1.1 (asperities) Harsh qualities or conditions: the asperities of a harsh and divided society
1.2 (usually asperities) A rough edge on a surface: the asperities of the metal surfaces

Origin
Middle English (in the sense 'hardship, rigor'): from Old French asperite, or Latin asperitas, from asper 'rough'.

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Imogen aspired to asperity.
Her work was not for charity.
Her laugh had no hilarity.
She dearly craved barbarity.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Mon Jul 21, 2014 10:09 am

Algot Runeman wrote:asperity

My grandma rarely went to see her darling dentist in between yearly check-ups.

But the rare instances when, usually after breakfast, her questing tongue detected an asperity on some tooth, she unfailingly requested a dental appointment.

With this daily exercise probing her teeth, grandma's tongue grew quite agile, sensitive and accurate over the years.
"And muscular too" quipped grandpa, "Once she tried to probe my teeth, forsooth."
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Mon Jul 21, 2014 5:10 pm

E Pericoloso Sporgersi wrote:(...)

With this daily exercise probing her teeth, grandma's tongue grew quite agile, sensitive and accurate over the years.
"And muscular too" quipped grandpa, "Once she tried to probe my teeth, forsooth."


I assume there was no acridity in your grandpa's remark. Or if there was, that he was not callow enough to allow it to suffuse into the tone of his voice.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Tue Jul 22, 2014 1:30 am

voralfred wrote:
E Pericoloso Sporgersi wrote:(...)

With this daily exercise probing her teeth, grandma's tongue grew quite agile, sensitive and accurate over the years.
"And muscular too" quipped grandpa, "Once she tried to probe my teeth, forsooth."
I assume there was no acridity in your grandpa's remark. ...

Not at all.
As a matter of fact, after that little lingual joust, both their faces were suffused with merriment and saliva.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Tue Jul 22, 2014 5:27 am

crowdsource

Pronunciation: /ˈkroudˌsôrs /
verb
[with object]
Obtain (information or input into a particular task or project) by enlisting the services of a number of people, either paid or unpaid, typically via the Internet: she crowdsourced advice on album art (as noun crowdsourcing) the paper seems more comfortable than many of its rivals wading into the world of crowdsourcing and citizen journalism

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

First, you need a crowd.
Then you must ask out loud.
And you can follow your dreams
When you crowdsource all your schemes.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Wed Jul 23, 2014 8:10 am

semblance

Pronunciation: /ˈsembləns /
noun
1 The outward appearance or apparent form of something, especially when the reality is different: she tried to force her thoughts back into some semblance of order
1.1 archaic Resemblance; similarity: it bears some semblance to the thing I have in mind

Origin
Middle English: from Old French, from sembler 'seem', from Latin similare, simulare 'simulate'.

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Today's irreverent, illustrative sentence displays merely a semblance of the full possible meaning. You will all do better. no doubt.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Wed Jul 23, 2014 8:39 am

Algot Runeman wrote:semblance

Even mirror twins show a remarkable semblance.

Except for the large zit on the one's nose.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Wed Jul 23, 2014 11:21 am

Except for the large zit on the one's nose.

I was hoping that would not be missed. The person looking into the mirror seems to have overlooked it.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Thu Jul 24, 2014 8:15 am

setose

Pronunciation: /ˈsēˌtōs /
adjective
chiefly Zoology
Bearing bristles or setae; bristly.

Origin
mid 17th century: from Latin seta 'bristle' + -ose1.

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-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

Hirsute Mary,
Hairy Harry,
Almost setose,
Bound to marry.
[Pity their children.]
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Thu Jul 24, 2014 9:54 am

Algot Runeman wrote:setose

Some setose animals are no laughing matter.
The Oak Processionary (Thaumetopoea processionea) is a moth whose caterpillars can be found in oak forests. They may pose a human irritant because of their poisonous setae (hairs), which may cause skin irritation and asthma.
In 2007 infestations in the Belgian province of Limburg were so acute that soldiers were deployed to burn them.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Fri Jul 25, 2014 7:09 am

guzzle

Pronunciation: /ˈgəzəl /
verb
[with object]
Eat or drink (something) greedily: we guzzle our beer and devour our pizza figurative this car guzzles gas

Origin
late 16th century: perhaps from Old French gosillier 'chatter, vomit', from gosier 'throat', from late Latin geusiae 'cheeks'.

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Somehow the James Bond persona would have suffered if he said, "A dry martini, guzzled, not sipped." instead.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Fri Jul 25, 2014 7:42 am

Algot Runeman wrote:guzzle

I assume fire-breathing dragons' muzzle velocity is higher than their kerosene guzzling speed?

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sat Jul 26, 2014 5:30 am

brannigan

Pronunciation: /ˈbranigən /
noun
North American informal
A brawl or violent argument.

Origin
late 19th century: of unknown origin; perhaps from the surname Brannigan.

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-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

Let's not get into a brannigan over it. Peace, brother.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Sat Jul 26, 2014 6:40 am

Algot Runeman wrote:brannigan

I remember Brannigan with fondness.

Though I still believe the Duke wasn't cast in the role. Not at all. I think the movie's script was written to fit him. And it turned out to be a Wild West Western magically transposed into present day (well, almost) London.

I'm sure the interactive adaptation must be a favorite choice in Quark's holosuites aboard DS9.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sun Jul 27, 2014 5:28 am

premonition

Pronunciation: /ˌprēməˈniSHən, ˌprem- /
noun
A strong feeling that something is about to happen, especially something unpleasant: he had a premonition of imminent disaster

Origin
mid 16th century (in the sense 'warning'): from French prémonition, from late Latin praemonitio(n-), from Latin praemonere, from prae 'before' + monere 'warn'.

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Joel had a bad feeling. The forest was too silent. It wasn't the lack of a breeze, but something else. Dread premonition washed over him as adrenalin surged through his system.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Mon Jul 28, 2014 10:07 am

apposite

Pronunciation: /ˈapəzit /
adjective
Apt in the circumstances or in relation to something: an apposite quotation the observations are apposite to the discussion

Origin
late 16th century: from Latin appositus, past participle of apponere 'apply', from ad- 'toward' + ponere 'put'.

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Molly had an appetite.
She ate anything in sight.
Until the tragic night
That the door became too tight.

She started on a diet
Just so she could try it.
The apposite plan, apply it.
Her success, you can't deny it.

Hank, the tank, was not an apposite example, but an opposite one. He's now 600 pounds. Zounds!
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Tue Jul 29, 2014 7:16 am

antebellum

Pronunciation: /ˌantēˈbeləm /
adjective
[attributive]
Occurring or existing before a particular war, especially the American Civil War: the conventions of the antebellum South

Origin
mid 19th century: from Latin, from ante 'before' and bellum 'war'.

---===---===---===---===---===---

Aunt Bella often said she would not have wanted to live in antebellum Mississippi. That she was a descendant of slaves from that very state might have had something to do with her sentiment.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Wed Jul 30, 2014 7:06 am

envenom

Pronunciation: /enˈvenəm /
verb
[with object] archaic
Put poison on or into; make poisonous.

Origin
Middle English (formerly also as invenom): from Old French envenimer, from en- 'in' + venim 'venom'.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

His voice was even, not meek nor strident. There was a smile on his face. The words delivered a kind message. It was the look in his eyes which envenomed his speech. The live audience knew the town was in trouble.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Thu Jul 31, 2014 6:50 am

glee

Pronunciation: /glē /
noun
1 Great delight: his face lit up with impish glee
2A song for men’s voices in three or more parts, usually unaccompanied, of a type popular especially circa 1750–1830.

Origin
Old English glēo 'entertainment, music, fun', of Germanic origin. sense 2 dates from the mid 17th century.

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=============================

It is with geat delight that I introduce the college glee club, an eager and talented choral group. With any luck, you will enjoy their songs.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Thu Jul 31, 2014 8:28 am

Algot Runeman wrote:glee
... the college glee club, an eager and talented choral group. ...

All the chorus guys expect, with barely suppressed glee, to meet Summer Glau in a romantic moonlight glow and stick to her like flies on glue.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Fri Aug 01, 2014 1:25 pm

humoresque

Pronunciation: /ˌ(h)yo͞oməˈresk /
noun
A short, lively piece of music.

Origin
late 19th century: from German Humoreske, from Humor 'humor'.

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--------------------------------------

Charlie, a budding composer, was dismayed to learn that a humoresque, although short, required more than just one note.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Fri Aug 01, 2014 3:57 pm

Algot Runeman wrote:humoresque

Would a humoresque composed in the Middle East perhaps be an arabesque?
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sat Aug 02, 2014 8:31 am

obloquy

Pronunciation: /ˈäbləkwē /
noun
1 Strong public criticism or verbal abuse: he endured years of contempt and obloquy
1.1 Disgrace, especially that brought about by public abuse: conduct to which no more obloquy could reasonably attach

Origin
late Middle English: from late Latin obloquium 'contradiction', from Latin obloqui, from ob- 'against' + loqui 'speak'.

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-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-

Addled addages:
Sticks and stones may break your bones, but obloquy can't hurt you.

Physical injury and emotional abuse, while different can both lead to difficulties later in life. Bullying is never acceptable in modern society.
NEVER! DO YOU HEAR ME? :oops:
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