Page 179 of 361

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Fri Nov 30, 2012 7:44 am
by Algot Runeman
infomania

Pronunciation: /ˌinfōˈmānēə/

noun
informal
the compulsive desire to check or accumulate news and information, typically via cell phone or computer: Wilson warned that the rise in infomania could reduce workers' mental sharpness

Derivatives

infomaniac
noun

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Nate Grigg

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Alex informed us of his need to know, in spite of being retired. However, he disavowed infomania. Yesterday, he didn't turn on any computer until after 6:45 A.M. Of course, he had read three national newspapers and a local one by then.

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Sat Dec 01, 2012 6:59 pm
by Algot Runeman
lusty

Pronunciation: /ˈləstē/

adjective (lustier, lustiest)
healthy and strong; full of vigor: the other farms had lusty young sons to work the land lusty singing

Derivatives
lustiness
noun

Origin:
Middle English: from lust (in the early sense 'vigor') + -y1

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Elvis Kennedy

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There are those who would describe the American football player, Clay Matthews, as a lusty guy. Some describing him so are lustful in their leering looks. Others would prefer to think worse of him, wishing he would get a haircut.

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Sun Dec 02, 2012 8:29 am
by Algot Runeman
propound

Pronunciation: /prəˈpound/

verb
[with object]
put forward (an idea, theory, or point of view) for consideration by others: he began to propound the idea of a “social monarchy” as an alternative to Franco

Derivatives
propounder
noun

Origin:
mid 16th century: alteration of archaic propone, from Latin proponere 'set forth', from pro- 'forward' + ponere 'put'. The addition of the final -d can be compared with that in expound and compound

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Wikipedia and doghouseboxing

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Nikita Khrushchev is sometimes remembered for pounding his shoe when another person at the United Nations was attempting to propound an idea to which Khrushchev objected. Professional pugilists take a more direct approach and simply pound their opponents.

[R.I.P Nikita and Hector.]

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Sun Dec 02, 2012 9:32 am
by E Pericoloso Sporgersi
Algot Runeman wrote:lusty

In intimate surroundings, my grandma used to call grandpa "My Lusty Rusty". Grandpa replied with "You Rusty Lusty!".

Enough said ...

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Sun Dec 02, 2012 9:36 am
by E Pericoloso Sporgersi
Algot Runeman wrote:propound

When grandma said "Lusty Rusty", she didn't have to propound it...

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2012 1:18 am
by ChoChiyo
One day a nameless individual irritated me with such excessive intensity that I hired Jesse Venture to give him a good PRO POUNDING. (My ex governor can beat up YOUR ex governor.) :smash: :cry: :lol:

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2012 7:03 am
by E Pericoloso Sporgersi
ChoChiyo wrote:One day a nameless individual irritated me with such excessive intensity that I hired Jesse Venture to give him a good PRO POUNDING. (My ex governor can beat up YOUR ex governor.) :smash: :cry: :lol:

Which ex governor do you mean? Good old Arnie?

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2012 12:05 pm
by Algot Runeman
catgut

Pronunciation: /ˈkatˌgət/

noun
a material used for the strings of some musical instruments, made of the dried twisted intestines of sheep or horses (but not cats).

Origin:
late 16th century: the association with cat1 remains unexplained

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Tom Brandt

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EEEEE-Yowwww! That's the sound when I stroke the bow across the catgut strings of my father's violin. My mother said my music is no worse than listening to the cat scream when I yank on her tail.

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 8:51 am
by Algot Runeman
dissentient

Pronunciation: /diˈsenSHənt/

adjective
in opposition to a majority or official opinion: dissentient voices were castigated as “hopeless bureaucrats.”

noun
a person who opposes a majority or official opinion.

Origin:
early 17th century: from Latin dissentient- 'differing in opinion', from the verb dissentire

Today's photo not brought to you by anybody. So there.

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GNU/Linux computer users are certainly dissentient. Bucking the majority is one thing, but also refusing to drink the other dissentient Kool-Aid makes us really loony.

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2012 2:07 pm
by Algot Runeman
shrieval

Syllabification: (shriev·al)
Pronunciation: /ˈSHrēvəl/

adjective
chiefly historical
of or relating to a sheriff.

Origin:
late 17th century: from shrieve, obsolete variant of sheriff

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Middlesex County Sheriff's Office

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The recent shrieval election put Peter Koutoujian into office.

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2012 2:06 am
by E Pericoloso Sporgersi
The mayor's last shrieval edicts stroked people's nerves like off key strung catgut. The most dissentient protesters tarred and feathered his effigy in front of city hall.

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2012 1:46 pm
by Algot Runeman
E.P.S. You are making the most of your visits. It won't be necessary to send the sheriff to verify your status.

Oh, and a little bulb to brighten your day, too.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2012 1:57 pm
by Algot Runeman
cheroot

Syllabification: (che·root)
Pronunciation: /SHəˈro͞ot/

noun
a cigar with both ends open and untapered.

Origin:
late 17th century: from French cheroute, from Tamil curuṭṭu 'roll of tobacco'

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worak

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Charlie raged about the flavor of his cheroots. Cheap they might be, but he loved a good stogie (which is what he called them). Though he lived in Conestoga Valley, PA, he had never even ridden in one of those pioneer wagons.

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2012 8:53 pm
by E Pericoloso Sporgersi
Algot Runeman wrote:cheroot...
Charlie raged about the flavor of his cheroots. Cheap they might be, but he loved a good stogie (which is what he called them). Though he lived in Conestoga Valley, PA, he had never even ridden in one of those pioneer wagons.

So maybe the three stooges smoked cheroots and rode a stogie?

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Fri Dec 07, 2012 12:54 pm
by Algot Runeman
diablerie

Syllabification: (di·a·ble·rie)
Pronunciation: /dēˈäblərē/

noun
reckless mischief; charismatic wildness: the beauty and diablerie of the great actor
archaic sorcery supposedly assisted by the devil.

Origin:
mid 18th century: from French, from diable, from ecclesiastical Latin diabolus 'devil'

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Carly Lesser and Art Drauglis

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Frank forged ahead, heedless of the consequences. His posse admired his diablerie and emulated his routine, though with far less success.

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Fri Dec 07, 2012 1:33 pm
by E Pericoloso Sporgersi
Algot Runeman wrote:diablerie
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If I'm caught red-handed while committing a diablerie (yes, in some rare instances I've been busted) I also stick out my tongue. Though mine is much less pointy than the girl's. Mine is rounded but, I must admit, somewhat hairy. Fortunately my tongue looks just as intelligent as Albert's.

Spoiler: show
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Sat Dec 08, 2012 6:11 am
by Algot Runeman
yukata

Syllabification: (yu·ka·ta)
Pronunciation: /yo͝oˈkätə/

noun (plural same or yukatas)
a light cotton kimono.

Origin:
Japanese, from yu 'hot water' (because originally worn indoors after a bath) + kata(bira) 'light kimono'

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Steven Rolland

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Karen's yukata replaced the old terrycloth bathrobe she'd used for years.

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Sat Dec 08, 2012 9:28 am
by E Pericoloso Sporgersi
Algot Runeman wrote:yukata

The french mignonnes have not only adopted the word, the have extended it into a mischievous expression.

Instead of whistling to pretend total innocence and denial of prankish behavior, they softly recite, with a sing-song intonation: "Youkaïdi, Yukata!"

You don't believe me? Well, here's irrefutable proof and a picture too.
Spoiler: show
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And the french scouts even have a song about it:
Spoiler: show

Youkaïdi,Youkata! :butter: ...

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Sun Dec 09, 2012 8:24 am
by Algot Runeman
G-suit

Syllabification: (G-suit)
(also anti-G suit)

noun
a garment with pressurized pouches that are inflatable with air or fluid, worn by fighter pilots and astronauts to enable them to withstand high forces of acceleration.

Origin:
1940s: from g (symbol of gravity) + suit

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Andres Musta

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Gee, whiz. Look at that G-man wearing his G-suit. It holds his gut in pretty well, doesn't it?

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Mon Dec 10, 2012 1:39 am
by E Pericoloso Sporgersi
Algot Runeman wrote:G-suit

Grandma, moderately fashion-conscious, would have had no comments whatsoever about G-suits. They appeared much too late for her to make a difference.

The G-string though ...
Spoiler: show
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Mon Dec 10, 2012 9:28 am
by Algot Runeman
Well...Legal Notice (in part):

"You may not systematically make printed or electronic copies of multiple extracts of the material for any purpose;" (Oxford Dictionaries Online)

purpose

noun
The reason for which something is done or created or for which something exists

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-;-=;-;-;-;-=;-;-;-;-=;-;-;-;-=;-;-;-;-=;-;-;-;-=;-;-;-;-=;-;-;-;-=;-;-;-;-=;-;-;-;-=;-;-;-;-=;-;-;-;-=;-;-;-;-=;-;-;

The word of the day exists for use. All words exist for use. Restricting the use of those words is counterproductive to their purpose.

[I guess that I need to be less systematic in my use of words. Otherwise, maybe we'll just make up our own. As it happens, I am currently reading 1984 by George Orwell. Suddenly, I feel like Winston Smith, gripping my composition book, filling it with words that are no longer allowed for any party member to use. Maybe I should just pick a random set of letters and make up some meaning.]

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Mon Dec 10, 2012 1:19 pm
by voralfred
In understand that, while on dry ground, one usually does not go on a trip without a specific purpose, under the sea, you normally need a porpoise to go on a journey.

The joke is not mine, of course, but do I need to tell where it comes from? The copyright has expired, in any case, so I am allowed to use it. It comes from one of the most garbolic books I ever read. Two even more garbolic books I read are by the same author, anyway...

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Tue Dec 11, 2012 12:12 am
by ChoChiyo
A porpoise with purpose doesn't piddle away the day. The purposeful porpoise puts his snout to the grindstone and his dorsal fin to the wheel and gets on with it.

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Tue Dec 11, 2012 3:11 am
by E Pericoloso Sporgersi
ChoChiyo wrote:A porpoise with purpose doesn't piddle away the day. The purposeful porpoise puts his snout to the grindstone and his dorsal fin to the wheel and gets on with it.

:D
Of course it serves no purpose if the purple porpoise is poised to purr ...

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Tue Dec 11, 2012 2:39 pm
by Algot Runeman
acrolect

Syllables: (ac·ro·lect)
Pronounce: ˈakrəˌlekt/

The dialect which most follows or exemplifies the "pure" language.
(Drawn from the study of creole, but now applied more generally.)

Wikipedia: "William Stewart, in 1965, proposed that the terms acrolect and basilect be the sociolinguistic labels for the upper and lower boundaries respectively of a post-creole speech continuum."

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e-codices

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Don donned his vestiments and prepared to read new testaments. He'd practiced over and over to ensure his Latin acrolect would show appropriate historical respect.