GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Fri Aug 27, 2010 2:52 am

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don

\ DON \ Hear it pronounced here.
(the word is repeated each time you hover the pointer over the word in pink)

verb:
1.
To put on or dress in.
noun:
1.
A Spanish title prefixed to a man's given name.
2.
(In the Mafia) a head of a family or syndicate.

Quotes:
For some inexpensive 3-D fun on a sunny day, have your child don the special glasses included with Optrix 3-D Bubbles (*) to see holographic stars, hearts, butterflies, or lightning bolts on the bubbles she blows.
-- Amy Kaldor-Bull, "Bubble toys that burst with fun," Kansas City Star, July 2010.

"Ay, ay, and the rector fancied, sitting teaching me Greek out of old wild Homer all weekday - and his girl slipping out and in - 'twould do to don the cassock of a Sunday and preach out of the pulpit against the world, the devil, and the flesh - then warn me against the sea - ha!
-- George Cupples, The green hand: adventures of a naval lieutenant: a sea story for boys

The timeless tale of imagination and the human will comes to the screen like never before in Orson Welles' Don Quixote.. Many of Welles' film projects remained incomplete at the time of his death, and for years the footage from this incomplete version remained locked away, unseen by the public.
-- Amazon.com description

Origin:
Don is an early 14th Century contraction of "do on," as doff is a similar contraction of "do off."

Irreverent example:
IBDoF's search engine is quixotic about don. It said, "The following words in your search query were ignored because they are too common words: don."
---
Grandpa returned home and silently went straight to the bathroom, undressed, took a thorough shower, sprayed himself with Salvador Dali Eau de Toilette for Men, donned a bathrobe and took a teaspoonful of his providential Amerindian adjuvant ...
---
(*) Optrix 3-D Bubbles:
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Fri Aug 27, 2010 3:23 pm

Bah! Do you, E.P.S., suggest I should have:
A; a memory that works?
B: a copy of Memory to hand?

I'm rotten at the literature game[*] of "name the character and the person to whom the speech was directed."
I'm usually double rotten at "name the book", too.

Sorry.

[*] 100% of my wife's world literature final exam was that kind of question: Name the book title, name the author, name the character who said it...I skipped that class, choosing instead to take organic chemistry as a six week summer school class: "memorize the entire alkane series of hydrocarbons for the first night's assignment. We'll plan the alkenes for tomorrow."

Who had the better deal?
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Sat Aug 28, 2010 10:01 am

Algot Runeman wrote:Bah! Do you, E.P.S., suggest I should have:
A; a memory that works?
Yes, of course I do. You're Texan.
Algot Runeman wrote:B: a copy of Memory to hand?
Sure, the UTP big print edition.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Sat Aug 28, 2010 10:42 am

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potlatch

\ POT-lach \ Hear it pronounced here.
(the word is repeated each time you hover the pointer over the word in pink)
noun:
1.
A ceremony at which gifts are bestowed on the guests in a show of wealth that the guests later attempt to surpass.

Quotes:
On social media, the potlatch takes the form of outtweeting and outsharing the field, overloading the network with fragments of oneself as users seek a ranking.
-- Rob Horning, "Gift Glut," Popmatters.com, May, 2010

I want to play around with the idea that the orgy of bonus-giving that is a way of life among Wall Street investment banks (and related institutions) is a perverse form of the potlatch , the ceremony among Northwest Coast Indians in which leaders (Big Men) give away enormous quantities of food and goods to another tribal group.
-- Bill Benzon, "The Wall Street Potlatch," New Savanna blog, Wall Street Journal, May 2010.

Origin:
Potlatch comes from the Chinook language, meaning "gift." Nearly identical words exist in the languages of various tribes of the Pacific Northwest.

Irreverent example:
Bill Pytlovani shamed the big software vendors with his generous potlatch to job-seeking Windows-users.
---
When grandpa visited the shaman they silently agreed to drop the potlatch ceremony, except for a voucher in exchange for a vial of potent medecine.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sat Aug 28, 2010 5:31 pm

Don, the "Don", donned the dun dungarees, declining design directions from wife, Donna, you know, the one in the musical chairs game where they use the tune, "La Donna in mobile." [She's also fickle, apparently, "e mobile" ]

[The ibdof system would not let me post this response yesterday...I'm trying again.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sat Aug 28, 2010 5:42 pm

Participating in the open source world, whether as a program coder or a documentation writer or just an avid user who reports back the bugs he encounters is potlatch activity. In fact, using open source materials and telling others that you do is giving, too. The more people who know about sharing and who begin to participate, the better the community becomes.

If you are looking for a great place to start, check out the Kids Open Dictionary Builder http://dictionary.k12opened.com/ which deserves mention here because it is a place for word lovers to make a small, real contribution. Of course, if you stick around and contribute a bunch of word definitions, all the better.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Sun Aug 29, 2010 2:54 am

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nitid

\ NIT-id \ Hear it pronounced here.
(the word is repeated each time you hover the pointer over the word in pink)

adjective:
1.
Bright; lustrous.

Quotes:
Intolerably, I dreamt of an exiguous and nitid labyrinth: in the center was a water jar; my hands almost touched it, my eyes could see it, but so intricate and perplexed were the curves that I knew I would die before reaching it.
-- Jorge Luis Borges, The Immortal

"What!" exclaimed Sir Norfolk, almost shuddering at the inadvertence he had committed; "a waiting-man in such costly and nitid attire."
-- William Harrison Ainsworth, The Miser's Daughter

Origin:
Nitid is related to the Latin nitidus , "glistening."

Irreverent example:
When the sachem realised the size and wealth of the potlatch, his facial expression became quite nitid.

Four completely different circumstances could make my grandpa's eyes very nitid.
    Always when my grandma, dressed in her beaver-fur stole and little else, paraded past him. Also when having heard a good one, his laughter made his eyes brim with moisture.
    Thirdly when viewing a very sad, heart-rending, tear-inducing scene in the movie theater.
    And finally when he happened to hit his thumb with the hammer.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sun Aug 29, 2010 6:15 am

On a drive through the countryside on a humid evening, after the glow of dusk has passed, with low level cloud cover one "benefits" from a side effect of modern life. There to the left or right, the clouds are nitid, reflecting the lights of the towns by which we travel.

That too, will fade tomorrow as we pass beyond the crowds. We camp for a week in the high hills of New Hampshire. The flickers of flame in the fire pit will be our substitute for incandescent bulbs.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Wed Sep 01, 2010 12:50 am

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behemoth

\ bih-HEE-muhth \ Hear it pronounced here.
(the word is repeated each time you hover the pointer over the word in pink)

noun;
1.
Any creature or thing of monstrous size or power
2.
An animal, perhaps the hippopotamus, mentioned in the Book of Job.

Quotes:
All the sportive rollickings of all the animals, from the agile fawn to the unwieldly behemoth , are dances taught them by nature.
-- Ambrose Bierce, They All Dance

And while that's not the case here, the retail behemoth clearly has the captive attention of mainstream America.
-- Dave Herrera, "3OH!3 gets enviable Walmart co-sign, prepares to print its own money," Denver Westword, July, 2010.

Origin:
Behemoth derives from the Hebrew b'hemoth in the Book of Job, but may be a folk etymology of Egyptian pehemau , "water-ox," the name for the hippopotamus.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Thu Sep 02, 2010 3:57 pm

"Wow, that thing is huge!"

"He's my pet."

"Be he moth?"

"No. He's a butterfly."

"Sure is beeyooteeful."
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Thu Sep 02, 2010 11:39 pm

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busticate

\ BUHS-ti-keyt \ Hear it pronounced here.
(the word is repeated each time you hover the pointer over the word in pink)
verb:
1.
To break into pieces.

Quotes:
We all know that there is nothing so easy to macerate, percolate, absquatulate and totally busticate as the Ten Commandments.
-- The Pharmaceutical Era (newspaper), 1908.

A security contest is being held by Google to try and busticate their native client code.
-- Dr. Raid (Blog pseudonym), "Google Native Client security contest," Graduated Script Kiddie blog, March, 2009.

Origin:
Busticate came into existence in the Northern United States during the 19th Century, as the common verb bust became wedded to the Latin root -icate . This phenomenon occurred across the U.S.; another example is the Southern coinage argufy .

Irreverent example:
I wouldn't be surprised if "busticate" is plastic surgeon's slang for "do a boob job", except in large cases when they behemothise.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Fri Sep 03, 2010 12:59 am

How many fur coats can one obtain by busticating a behemoth's pelt? That question would have fascinated your grandmother, wouldn't it?
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Fri Sep 03, 2010 12:02 pm

My grandma took meticulous care of her furs. She used all possible tricks to fight off moths and behemoths alike. If she happened to catch one red-handed, she dauntlessly went at it with a fly swatter, a tennis racket or a waffle iron and busticated it to smithereens. That's why sporadically the waffles tasted funny ...

P.S.
I'm very glad you're finally back, Voralfred. Algot and I were starting to feel a bit lonely in here. Let us hope Darb too can rejoin us soon.

And the rest of the gang?
Come on guys, add your two cents worth, will you, pretty please?
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby MidasKnight » Fri Sep 03, 2010 1:19 pm

E Pericoloso Sporgersi wrote:And the rest of the gang?
Come on guys, add your two cents worth, will you, pretty please?


I fear you have a better grasp of my native language than I do. Any inclusions I put into this thread would be weak and far too much effort. Cleverness is not a virtue I am graced with.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Sat Sep 04, 2010 4:34 pm

E Pericoloso Sporgersi wrote:My grandma took meticulous care of her furs. She used all possible tricks to fight off moths and behemoths alike. If she happened to catch one red-handed, she dauntlessly went at it with a fly swatter, a tennis racket or a waffle iron and busticated it to smithereens. That's why sporadically the waffles tasted funny ...


Now I understand why the behemoth's pelt I received at that potlatch was not as nitid as usual, having a waffle-iron shaped burned and hairless place. So instead of donning it, I fulgurated the donator, thus starting a brannigan.

MK: my own contributions are not so fantastic either, compared to those by Algot, (or the "irrreverent examples by EPS) but it is still fun ;)
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Sun Sep 05, 2010 3:11 am

Nice catch up, Voralfred. And also
voralfred wrote:Besides Laisa, who appears in Memory, there is (at least one) another female character by LMB explicitly called zaftig ...
Could it be Learned Hallana? That's how I picture her, anyway. I'm also thinking of Kareen, the shortest, I believe, of the four Koudelka valkyries.

voralfred wrote:... Contrary to Algot's supposition, I would say Elli Quinn is too muscular to be zaftig ...
Not necessarily. Consider Serena Williams
Spoiler: show
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Kim Clijsters
Spoiler: show
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or professional mud-wrestlers
Spoiler: show
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Those are undoubtedly muscular women, but zaftig enough too. While Justine Henin ...
Spoiler: show
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voralfred wrote:... I'm trying to contribute to WOTD, but I cannot write as well as Algot or you. ...
Rubbish! Whereas Algot's words skilfully flow from his, er, fingertips, I need a translating dictionary to check my choice of words and spelling. And I never have any problem understanding your posts, nor MidasKnight's or Darb's, which I can't say for some other English-native people.

voralfred wrote:... Flaubert did use the verb "fulgurer" in French, in "Tentation de Saint Antoine". I did not even know the word existed!
At first I thought "fulgurate" also meant a chemical, an explosive compound, but I was wrong. I was confusing with "fulminate".
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Though the word "fulguration" is not used in dentistry, the technique is. The apparatus is called "electrotome" or "bistouri électrique". It is used to cut the gingiva and/or close small vessels and capillaries to stop the bleeding.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Sun Sep 05, 2010 4:24 am

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Okay, time for a new one, I guess.

casuistry

\ KAZH-oo-uh-stree \ Hear it pronounced here.
(the word is repeated each time you hover the pointer over the word in pink)

noun:
1.
Specious, deceptive, or oversubtle reasoning, esp. in questions of morality.
2.
The application of general ethical principles to particular cases of conscience or conduct.

Quotes:
The popular objection to casuistry is similar to the popular objection to the maxim that the ends justify the means.
-- John Dewey, Experience and Nature and Human Nature

"And how will it work in infinite time? It's nothing but casuistry , casuistry . It's a way of explaining my own impotence."
-- Isaac Bashevis Singer, The Seance

Origin:
Casuistry comes from the French casuiste and the Latin casus , "case," perhaps related to making a case or justifying behavior.

Irreverent example:
I hope you'll forgive me for committing casuistry or actively seeking it, when I'm telling anecdotes about my grandma and her fur coats.

However I do keep in mind that, in this forum, we are allowed to be specious, expected to be humorous and goaded to be casuistical, but that we always have to uphold the highest moral values with a grain of salt.

How about that for an ambiguous sentence?

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sun Sep 05, 2010 12:25 pm

Kazooistry - The serious attempt to integrate a kazoo section into the wind instrument group of major symphonic music.

First promoted by Joy Morton, of Morton "When it rains, it pours" Salt, who wanted to contribute some of his wealth to worthy efforts, and because his mother and daughter were delighted by his own play of family favorites on the kazoo. (Strangely, only his wife is known to have voiced any regret over his plan.) He is well known for contributions to the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry, but the brief, flawed effort to enhance the repute of kazoo music is little known. Only one performance was attempted by Theodore Thomas, original director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. It is said that he would have missed his chance at the directorship if he had recommended a repeat of the single performance.

Since that time, the kazoo has joined the slide whistle as infamous musical instruments. The well known Silly Symphonies produced by Walt Disney in the 1930s notably rejected inclusion of the kazoo in the popular cartoons.

[Take every contribution to the WotD archives, those from me anyway, with several grains of salt (Morton or another brand). Some of us have little honor and less care for the morality of our contributions, content with casuistry and calumny.]

It would probably be a good idea to promote some honest attempts to use the WotD in the way the quoted examples do. If only we who sneer and make snide use of the words participate here, these fine words will join the kazoo in the pile of rejected stuff. MidasKnight and others who visit may want to offer support for these words while the mean spirited among us :twisted: continue our japes and mocking contributions.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Tue Sep 07, 2010 2:35 am

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blithe

\ BLAYTH \ Hear it pronounced here.
(the word is repeated each time you hover the pointer over the word in pink)

adjective:
1.
Joyous or merry in disposition.
2.
Without thought or regard; carefree; heedless.

Quotes:
A young maiden will laugh as a tender flower will blow - ay, and a lad will like her the better for it; just as the same blithe Spring that makes the young birds whistle, bids the blithe fawns skip.
-- Sir Walter Scott, Woodstock; or, The cavalier

Scientific American has estimated that development of a machine with self-awareness is very likely by the year 2050. Robin Hanson questions whether they really believe this because they were relatively blithe about the prediction, considering the unpredictable, but immeasurable, impact.
-- Lynn Fikstad, "Singularity," Meme Log, July, 2010.

Origin:
Blithe stems from a Germanic root, blidi , "happy." The sense of the word has shifted from the outward expression of joy to the description of an interior state.

Irreverent example:
Though grandpa always had a sunny nature, he became particularly blithe when grandma asked him to do the dishes after dinner. It meant that she was feeling amorous and that, by the time he had finished washing up, she would be ready and titivated with her titillating stole.
---
"Blimey, Captain Bligh seems in a blithe mood today."
"Oh bleh! Wait till you hear him say 'bleagh' when he tastes today's soup. Ye should prepare for a blight."

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Tue Sep 07, 2010 4:04 am

I feel mutinous! :evil:

When I discovered today's WOTD, I immediately felt blithe (meaning #1), because I thought, "Hey, I have a spendid idea for an example!"

Then I read the end of EPS's post and I discovered he had blithely (meaning #2) stolen my idea!

I'll put a bounty on your head for that, EPS!

:pirate:


But I'll still help you about LMB's second explicitly zaftig character: she is a very minor one, that appears just for three paragraphs, long enough to be called zaftig twice, to disappear into oblivion, still swathed in her yards of creamy silk.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Tue Sep 07, 2010 5:37 am

voralfred wrote:When I discovered today's WOTD, I immediately felt blithe (meaning #1), because I thought, "Hey, I have a spendid idea for an example!"
Then I read the end of EPS's post and I discovered he had blithely (meaning #2) stolen my idea!

But I'll still help you about LMB's second explicitly zaftig character: she is a very minor one, that appears just for three paragraphs, long enough to be called zaftig twice, to disappear into oblivion, still swathed in her yards of creamy silk.

Your logic is as fallacious as dividing by zero.

And if you maintain that you can divide me by zero, then that implies that the result is infinite, ergo that I'm an imaginary number. Thanks, but no thanks.

Also you're blatantly violating causality, because your "splendid idea for an example" could not possibly have arisen without my post in the first place. Unless you have a time machine, but then you should have posted your example before I did.

To top it all off, you blithely disregard Newton's Third Law. In other words, your reaction was NOT simultaneous with my action but consecutive, like the proverbial egg and the blithe chicken.

And you being a physicist, shame on you!

About zaftig:
Are you refering to Mia Maz, the Marilacan attache who ends up blithely marrying Ambassador Vorobyev in Cetaganda?
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Wed Sep 08, 2010 9:12 am

Cici blithely disregarded all the bickering going on around her and stepped quickly off the bathhouse porch, crossing the wet sand, and ran into the lake as soon after the thunder had passed to safely avoid becoming a lightning rod. She didn't care about all the litter of leaves and small twigs still blowing across the surface in the breeze as the clouds moved away. The sun was out, and she wasn't going to be held back from a brisk swim.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Fri Sep 10, 2010 11:10 pm

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prognosticate

\ prog-NOS-ti-keyt \ Hear it pronounced here.
(the word is repeated each time you hover the pointer over the word in pink)

verb:
1.
To forecast or predict (something future) from present indications or signs; prophesy.
2.
To provide an indication of future events through actions or signs.

Quotes:
While it's too early to prognosticate if soccer can work its way into the upper echelon of sports in the U.S., the game certainly is riding a high.
-- Greg Cavanaugh, "Football at Fenway Perfect Fit for 2010 Summer of Soccer," The New England Sports Network, July 2010.

This task was accordingly undertaken by the lame lieutenant, who, among other paragraphs, read that which follows, with an elevation of voice which seemed to prognosticate something extraordinary: ' We are informed, that admiral Bower will very soon be created a British peer, for his eminent services during the war, particularly in his late engagement with the French fleet.'
-- Tobias George Smollett, The adventures of Peregrine Pickle

Origin:
Prognosticate derives from the Latin prognosticare , "to tell the future."
Irreverent example:

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby umsolopagas » Sat Sep 11, 2010 8:11 am

Meteorologists may prognosticate about weather and weather patterns but how many times are they right, especially in view of unpredictable global weather conditions?
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Sat Sep 11, 2010 9:48 am

umsolopagas wrote:Meteorologists may prognosticate about weather and weather patterns but how many times are they right, especially in view of unpredictable global weather conditions?

Obviously you never watched Armand Pien
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