GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

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E Pericoloso Sporgersi
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by E Pericoloso Sporgersi »

Algot Runeman wrote: Thu Aug 05, 2021 9:39 am carbohydrate
Though American muscle cars consume hydrocarbons like some of their owners eat carbohydrates, hydrocarbons and carbohydrates are totally different substances. You cannot substitute one for the other.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

ulterior

Pronunciation /ʌlˈtɪərɪə/
adjective
1 Existing beyond what is obvious or admitted; intentionally hidden.
1.1 Beyond what is immediate or present; coming in the future.

Origin
Mid 17th century from Latin, literally ‘further, more distant’.

==========

Frank thought his work superior,
While that done by Joe was inferior.
But he kept his thoughts well hidden
Because of motives quite ulterior.

[I don't think I have ever heard ulterior used to modify any word other than motives. Every example sentence given for the primary definition by Lexico included "ulterior motive(s)". Ulterior treasures? Ulterior rewards in heaven? Ulterior weapons?]

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by voralfred »

E Pericoloso Sporgersi wrote: Wed Aug 04, 2021 8:26 pm
voralfred wrote: Wed Aug 04, 2021 4:43 am Would it be a dysphemism to call Joe a deurmekaar ?
"Deurmekaar" is two words concatenated, as is ubiquitous in Dutch and German, but much less so in English.
They are "deur" and "mekaar", meaning "through" and "each other".

"Topsy turvy" is the better fitting English translation of "deurmekaar".

The sentence "Would it be a dysphemism to call Joe a deurmekaar ?" actually contains a grammatical error. The Dutch "deurmekaar" is an adjective exclusively while the preceding article "a" would make it a noun.

For example: the sentence "Would it be a dysphemism to call Joe a topsy turvy?" is grammatically incorrect, because the article "a" is misused.

P.S. I'll try to avoid any more bouts of nitpicking this year. :neutral:
Sorry for this severe grammatical error and thanks for correcting me. I'll try not to stay as deurmekaar as I have shown myself to be.
I'm afraid that to compensate for the shame I have caused to myself, I'll have to resort to the consumption of huge amounts of carbohydrates. The ulterior (meaning 1.1) consequences on my body mass index will be disastrous.


Edit
In the meaning 1, I agree with Algot, I've never seen it used unless it qualifies the word "motives". In meaning 1.1, well, you see I have just used it :lol:
But "ulterior rewards in Heaven", yes, I do believe I have seen this phrase before.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

derive

Pronunciation /dɪˈrʌɪv/
verb
[with object] derive something from
1 Obtain something from (a specified source)
1.1 derive something from Base a concept on an extension or modification of (another concept)
1.2 derive from no object (of a word) have (a specified word, usually of another language) as a root or origin.
1.3 derive from no object Arise from or originate in (a specified source)
1.4 be derived from Linguistics (of a sentence in a natural language) be linked by a set of stages to (its underlying logical form).
1.5 be derived from(of a substance) be formed or prepared by (a chemical or physical process affecting another substance)
1.6 Mathematics Obtain (a function or equation) from another by a sequence of logical steps, for example by differentiation.

Origin
Late Middle English (in the sense ‘draw a fluid through or into a channel’): from Old French deriver or Latin derivare, from de- ‘down, away’ + rivus ‘brook, stream’.

==========

Computer logic currently depends on silicon derived from sand or gravel. Delta sand is found downstream from an upstream source, too.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by voralfred »

Algot Runeman wrote: Sat Aug 07, 2021 3:52 pm derive

Pronunciation /dɪˈrʌɪv/
verb
[with object] derive something from
1 Obtain something from (a specified source)
1.1 derive something from Base a concept on an extension or modification of (another concept)
1.2 derive from no object (of a word) have (a specified word, usually of another language) as a root or origin.
1.3 derive from no object Arise from or originate in (a specified source)
1.4 be derived from Linguistics (of a sentence in a natural language) be linked by a set of stages to (its underlying logical form).
1.5 be derived from(of a substance) be formed or prepared by (a chemical or physical process affecting another substance)
1.6 Mathematics Obtain (a function or equation) from another by a sequence of logical steps, for example by differentiation.

Origin
Late Middle English (in the sense ‘draw a fluid through or into a channel’): from Old French deriver or Latin derivare, from de- ‘down, away’ + rivus ‘brook, stream’.

==========

Computer logic currently depends on silicon derived from sand or gravel. Delta sand is found downstream from an upstream source, too.

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If we are talking about nitpicking, the guy who wrote the meaning 1.6 doesn't understand much about Mathematics. (Algot, I know you just copied it as its stood, and are in no way responsible)

1.6 Mathematics Obtain (a function or equation) from another by a sequence of logical steps, for example by differentiation.
This mixes two entirely different notions of "derivation"
a) Derive a new concept : obtain a new equation, or prove a new proposition, or even find a new function, from one or more others, by a sequence of logical steps
However this meaning is identical to 1.1
For instance, Painlevé and his disciple Garnier derived six new functions called "The six transcendental Painlevé functions" (poor Garnier was forgotten by History, though he derived three of them, and the hardest ones at that) by a very long sequence of logical steps proving that they were the only ones to satisfy some very specific set of conditions they had fixed at the start. Don't ask me why they had chosen this set of conditions. But it had kept my salary rolling for all those years (about forty !) to study them... As a matter of fact, I do (more or less) know why, but the very prospect of trying to start the beginning of a first step towards an attempt to explaining that... I lack the vocabulary to list the restrictions...
b) Derive a function : obtain a different function by differentiation.
Usually, the function thus obtained is not new but was known before.
But it is not always the case. For instance if you differentiate any of the six transcendental Painlevé functions you find still a new function, that does not satisfy the full set of conditions, so it is not one of the six first ones. In that particular case "derivation" in meaning (1.6.b), differentiation, happens to be also "derivation" in sense (1.6.a), namely, meaning (1.1). This, however, is rather unusual.
Last edited by voralfred on Sun Aug 08, 2021 1:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by E Pericoloso Sporgersi »

Algot Runeman wrote: Sat Aug 07, 2021 3:52 pm derive
Would you Algot, and Voralfred too, accept "extrapolate" as a synonym of "derive"?
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by voralfred »

E Pericoloso Sporgersi wrote: Sun Aug 08, 2021 12:13 pm
Algot Runeman wrote: Sat Aug 07, 2021 3:52 pm derive
Would you Algot, and Voralfred too, accept "extrapolate" as a synonym of "derive"?
Well, a synonym, not really. However I am in the opinion that to extrapolate could be one of the ways to achieve derivation in meaning 1.1 (or 1.6.a). But it does not cover all the richness of a mathematical derivation. Calling the six transcendental Painlevé functions mere "extrapolations" of previously known functions seems... a bit disparaging. Though, in a certain sense, not completely absurd...
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

obligation

Pronunciation /ɒblɪˈɡeɪʃ(ə)n/
noun
1 An act or course of action to which a person is morally or legally bound; a duty or commitment.
with infinitive ‘I have an obligation to look after her’
1.1 mass noun The condition of being morally or legally bound to do something.
1.2 A debt of gratitude for a service or favour.
1.3 Law A binding agreement committing a person to a payment or other action.

Origin
Middle English (in the sense ‘formal promise’): via Old French from Latin obligatio(n-), from the verb obligare (see oblige).

==========

It is the village obligation
To provide, for all, an adequate ration.
So wisely choose those who should lead,
That the entire village can succeed.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

half-pie

adjective
informal New Zealand
Imperfect; mediocre.

Origin
Pie perhaps from Maori pai ‘good’.

==========

Being half-pie is better than being absent from the scene.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by E Pericoloso Sporgersi »

Algot Runeman wrote: Tue Aug 10, 2021 8:42 am half-pie
"There's a half-pie gone already."
or
"There's still a half-pie left over."

That reminds me of something.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

bovver

Pronunciation /ˈbɒvə/
noun
informal British mass noun, usually as modifier
Hooliganism or violent disorder, especially as caused by gangs of skinheads.

Origin
Late 19th century (in sense ‘trouble, difficulty’): representing a child's or cockney pronunciation of bother.

=========

It is not easy, trying to be both a bovver boy and simultaneously bland.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

caff

Pronunciation /kaf/
noun
informal British
A cafe.

Origin
1930s representing a pronunciation.

==========

*The Cafe*

Overdoing the silent E
Is really astounding to me.
And though with words I play
I must in all honesty say,
I cannot help but laugh
When I hear it called a caff.

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[At some point in the development of this post, I realized that during my college days (native USA), we did refer to the cafeteria as the caff. I wonder if British visitors can help clarify my sense of UK use.)
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by E Pericoloso Sporgersi »

Algot Runeman wrote: Thu Aug 12, 2021 9:20 am caff
I guess singing

"Hey, Rosita come quick
Down at the caff they giving green stamps with tequila!!"


would sound rather silly.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

ickle

Pronunciation /ˈɪk(ə)l/
adjective
informal
A child's word for little (often expressing endearment)

Origin
Mid 19th century representing a child's pronunciation of little.

==========

I'll offer you a pickle,
Perhaps even a nickel,
If you can quote a published sentence
Which actually uses "ickle".

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by E Pericoloso Sporgersi »

Algot Runeman wrote: Fri Aug 13, 2021 11:01 am ickle
There's sickle cell anaemia. Does that count?
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

carafe

Pronunciation /kəˈraf/ /kəˈrɑːf/
noun
An open-topped glass flask used for serving wine or water in a restaurant.

Origin
Late 18th century from French, from Italian caraffa, probably based on Arabic g̣arafa ‘draw water’.

==========

No, don't whine about it. It's still morning here, so this carafe is designed for coffee.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by voralfred »

You say that "caff" is informal for "cafe", the place, in British english.

In French "caff" is rather informal for the drink.

So your illustration could be a "carafe de caff".

But there is much more than an ickle of caff in this carafe.


Ooops... too late, you already went on...
Last edited by voralfred on Sun Aug 15, 2021 11:40 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

voralfred wrote: Sun Aug 15, 2021 3:00 am
In French "caff" is rather informal for the drink.

So your illustration could be a "carafe de caff".
:clap:

"A carafe of caff"
That makes me laugh.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

august

Pronunciation /ɔːˈɡʌst/
adjective
Respected and impressive.

Origin
Late 16th century from French auguste or Latin augustus ‘worthy of respect, venerable, majestic’.

==========

You can be in august company any month of the year, not just in August. Whether you deserve to be there is another question.

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[This word is very common in the WotD topic. It has been written over and over...and over, though not used as the focus word. It has, before, only been used in the context of the month of the year or a minor part of a post. Another interesting note is that today, the fifteenth of August, is not technically the Ides of August. In the Roman calendar, the Ides were the thirteenth of the month. I don't know why. I checked a couple of online resources which only said that March, May, July and October had the Ides on the 15th. More significantly, perhaps is that the Ides were determined by being the day of the full moon in a given month. In 2021, the 15th of August occurs on the day of the first quarter moon. Confusing, for sure. By the Roman reckoning, based on lunar phases, this should be the Nones, anyway, not the Ides!]
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

nap hand

Pronunciation
noun
informal
A series of five winning points, victories, etc. in a game or sport.

==========

Baseball rarely has a five-game series, so I'm not familiar with a nap hand win.

Image

If I had not seen the definition, I'd have thought it meant a hand bent sideways so that it lost circulation during one of my naps.

I know "rubber match", however, and there's "hat trick", too.

I wonder what other similar terms are out there.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

moreish

Pronunciation /ˈmɔːrɪʃ/
adjective
informal British
So pleasant to eat that one wants more.

==========

Tom leaned forward and took his wife's hand.

"Susan, this dish is absolutely morieish."

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What food that you eat, do you call "moreish"?
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by E Pericoloso Sporgersi »

Algot Runeman wrote: Tue Aug 17, 2021 7:48 am moreish
...
What food that you eat, do you call "moreish"?
Lean horse steak à la Fondue Bourguignonne.

The very last morsel is just as tender, juicy, perfectly cooked and warm as the very first.
And each cube of meat can be "bien cuit", "à point", "saignant" or "bleu", whatever your own favourite style.

P.S. My mom used to claim that the very first word I spoke was the Flemish word "nog", meaning more.
One day my dad thought to prank me with a pacifier dipped in mustard. But I flabbergasted him when i said "Nog". That was my first case of ROTFLOL.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

felloes

Pronunciation /ˈfɛləʊz/
plural noun
(also fellies)
The outer rim of a wheel, to which the spokes are fixed.

Origin
Old English felg (singular); related to Dutch velg and German Felge; of unknown ultimate origin.

==========

None the Wiser, Bud

I got to know some fellows.
Whose work was making felloes.
They helped to make the wagon wheels
For those massive beer hauling deals,
The ones pulled by those Clydesdales
Up all those hills and down into them dales.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by voralfred »

From the point of view of Iago, Moorish Othello was certainly not moreish.

For the word felloes, you already used the only pun I could have imagined. I'm afraid I'll pass....

Edit :
Algot Runeman wrote: Wed Aug 18, 2021 10:58 am felloes

Pronunciation /ˈfɛləʊz/
plural noun
(also fellies)
The outer rim of a wheel, to which the spokes are fixed.
I did get an idea, but it is rather a long shot. Also a bit Bard-related.
In "Brave New World", Aldous Huxley's famous SF novel, instead of movies, there are "feelies", where thanks to electric contacts on the arms, the spectators were actually feeling whatever the characters of the "feelie" were supposed to feel.
For some reason, the feature where the main character had the fellies of a heavily loaded wagon run over his legs did not have a big success...

And this is my contribution on August 19th, though probably still August 18th on the forum's time.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

methinks

Pronunciation /mɪˈθɪŋks/
verb methought /mɪˈθɔːt/
[no object] archaic, humorous
It seems to me.

Origin
Old English mē thyncth, from mē ‘to me’ + thyncth ‘it seems’ (from thyncan ‘seem’, related to think).

==========

Seemly Suggestion

Methinks, today, some hi-jinks
Are in order, maybe even tall, cool drinks,
No matter what you or anybody thinks,
As toward the weekend Thursday slinks.

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