GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

semi-pro

Pronunciation /sɛmɪˈprəʊ/
adjective
informal
Receiving payment for an activity but not relying entirely on it for a living; semi-professional.
noun plural noun semi-pros
informal
A person who is engaged in an activity on a semi-professional basis.

Origin
Early 20th century short for semi-professional.

==========

As neither a professional wordsmith, not even semi-pro, I suppose it might be fair to call me semi-amateur.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

set screw

Pronunciation
/set skro͞o/ /sɛt skru/
noun
A screw for adjusting or clamping parts of a machine.

==========

When you attach the pulley to the motor's shaft, tighten it securely with a set screw.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by E Pericoloso Sporgersi »

Algot Runeman wrote: Thu Sep 30, 2021 1:37 pm set screw
...
When you attach the pulley to the motor's shaft, tighten it securely with a set screw.
So if people say I have a loose screw, they mean my set screw isn't properly tightened and I ought to get serious, right?
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

polysemy

Pronunciation
/ˈpɒlɪsiːmi/ /pəˈlɪsɪmi/
noun
mass noun
Linguistics
The coexistence of many possible meanings for a word or phrase.

Origin
Early 20th century from poly-‘many’ + Greek sēma ‘sign’.

==========

Pete said to Paulie Semee:
"Get me a drink.
If you don't, you're gonna get it!
Don't you get my meaning?
Sometimes I'm not sure your my get."

(A little paranym sneaked in there. Note: not paronym, which we have used before.)

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

saxatile

Pronunciation
/ˈsaksətʌɪl/ /-tɪl/
adjective
rare
Living or growing on or among rocks.

Origin

Mid 17th century from French saxatile or Latin saxatilis, from saxum ‘rock’.

==========

Moss on rocks is common, but I guess since few know to call the moss saxatile, it is fair for the word to be rare in spite of the widespread existence of mossy rocks. The word for mosses which grow on trees is probably just a little better known: epiphyte. Or maybe not!

[Wandering even further afield, I wonder why the sounds of rocks clacking together is not called saxaphone music (making a vague reference to the movie, "What's Up Doc?") .]

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

gilding

Pronunciation /ˈɡɪldɪŋ/
noun
mass noun
1 The process of applying gold leaf or gold paint.
1.1 The material used in, or the surface produced by, gilding.

==========

Would it be gilding the lily to express how much I enjoy this forum topic?

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Last edited by Algot Runeman on Sun Oct 03, 2021 4:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by E Pericoloso Sporgersi »

Algot Runeman wrote: Sun Oct 03, 2021 10:32 am gilding
...
Would it be gilding the lilly to express how much I enjoy this forum topic?
Unless it's a little gilded white lie ? ... :twisted:
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

My apologies for over-loving the letter L by spelling lily as "lilly". It should be easier, because the forum software does that automatic spelling check...which I appear to simply ignore.

There was once a fish called Wanda, but I don't know any gilled Lilly.

The error has disappeared from the original post above, but has been recorded in the reply by E.P.S. where I saw (and you may review) the misspelling in all its glory.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

whistle

Pronunciation /ˈwɪs(ə)l/
noun
1 A clear, high-pitched sound made by forcing breath through a small hole between partly closed lips, or between one's teeth.
1.1 A shrill, high-pitched sound.
1.2 An instrument used to produce a shrill, high-pitched sound, especially for giving a signal.
verb
Emit a shrill, high-pitched sound.

Origin
From rhyming slang whistle and flute.

==========

It is expedient to whistle up an alternate word when the one on offer from the dictionary is offensive. Besides, I had the image ready from a recently completed 3D Printing project.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by voralfred »

Algot Runeman wrote: Mon Oct 04, 2021 10:52 am whistle

(...)

It is expedient to whistle up an alternate word when the one on offer from the dictionary is offensive. Besides, I had the image ready from a recently completed 3D Printing project.

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If you were to use an offensive word, then a whistle-blower would certainly call you to order.

Conversely, to avoid such a term you said that you had introduced a paranym in the post about Paulie (why not Polly ?) Semee. Was that the second "get" ("get it" for a much stronger description of her fate if she did not satisfy Pete's whims at once) ?
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

E.P.S wrote: Conversely, to avoid such a term you said that you had introduced a paranym in the post about Paulie (why not Polly ?) Semee. Was that the second "get" ("get it" for a much stronger description of her fate if she did not satisfy Pete's whims at once) ?
Polly wasn't in the game. I had the image of the young man (Paulie, here) in his hoodie from before and added an angry father to my gallery of clipart, combining the two images into the polysemy post.

[Revealing one's sneaky tricks is not difficult, particularly when it is among friends. Pete's (nom du jour) whims are occasionally autobiographical, but, thankfully, not in this case. I have not needed to be so harsh with my children.]
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by E Pericoloso Sporgersi »

Algot Runeman wrote: Tue Oct 05, 2021 7:51 am
E.P.S wrote: Conversely, to avoid such a term you said that you had introduced a paranym in the post about Paulie (why not Polly ?) Semee. Was that the second "get" ("get it" for a much stronger description of her fate if she did not satisfy Pete's whims at once) ?
Actually Voralfred wrote that.
To i and t.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

gazette

Pronunciation /ɡəˈzɛt/
noun
1 usually in names A journal or newspaper.
1.1 British An official publication containing lists of government appointments and promotions and other public notices.
1.2 historical A news-sheet.

Origin
Early 17th century via French from Italian gazzetta, originally Venetian gazeta de la novità ‘a halfpennyworth of news’ (because the news-sheet sold for a gazeta, a Venetian coin of small value).

==========

Giles gazed at the "Oldport News Times, Gazette" to little effect. He had to wait for somebody to step up to read it to him.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by E Pericoloso Sporgersi »

Algot Runeman wrote: Tue Oct 05, 2021 11:50 am gazette
There used to be a Gazette van Detroit until 2018.
"The Gazette van Detroit is an unaffiliated, apolitical, non-profit organization written by and for North Americans of Flemish descent and Dutch-speaking Belgians. Its goal is to serve as a cultural bridge between North America and the Dutch-speaking region of Belgium. Simultaneously, the Gazette seeks cordial relations with all ethnicities and nationalities."
And there still exists a Gazet van Antwerpen.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

E.P.S. and voralfred,

Ah, phooey! I may be getting too old to keep my friends straight. :crazy:
Fortunately, I am not to old to apologize for making such a mistake.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

chelonian

Pronunciation /kɪˈləʊnɪən/
noun
Zoology
A reptile of the order Testudines (formerly Chelonia ); a turtle, terrapin, or tortoise.
adjective
Zoology
Relating to or denoting chelonians.

==========

Bob is well known for maintaining a chelonian pace in all his dealings.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

monologophobia

Noun
1 An aversion to using the same word twice.
1.1 A fear of using a word more than once in a single sentence or paragraph.

Origin
The term monologophobia was coined by New York Times editor Theodore M. Bernstein in The Careful Writer, 1965.

==========

Over and over and over again, we are reminded to not repeat a word in this forum. We have institutional monologophobia. And yet, a tall stack of pancakes is never off limits!

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[Today's word choice was, in fact, a replacement for nictophobia used back a few years...but there's no doubt at all; someone would notice.]
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

downright

Pronunciation /ˈdaʊnrʌɪt/
adjective
1 attributive (of something bad or unpleasant) utter; complete (used for emphasis)
2 So direct in manner as to be blunt.
adverb
as submodifier
To an extreme degree; thoroughly.

==========

It's a downright shame that we cannot use these stairs to go up left.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

mizzen-top

Pronunciation /ˈmɪzntɒp/
noun
Nautical
A platform just above the head of the mizzen-mast, designed to spread the shrouds of the topmast and the topgallant mast.

Origin
Late 15th century. From mizzen + top.

==========

Standing on the mizzen-top is easier than bracing on the footropes below the yards, but a square rig sailor must be prepared to do both.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by E Pericoloso Sporgersi »

Algot Runeman wrote: Sat Oct 09, 2021 9:58 am mizzen-top
To me standing upright on the mizzen-top sounds downright scary.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by voralfred »

Algot Runeman wrote: Thu Oct 07, 2021 12:46 pm monologophobia

Noun
1 An aversion to using the same word twice.
1.1 A fear of using a word more than once in a single sentence or paragraph.

Origin
The term monologophobia was coined by New York Times editor Theodore M. Bernstein in The Careful Writer, 1965.

==========

Over and over and over again, we are reminded to not repeat a word in this forum. We have institutional monologophobia. And yet, a tall stack of pancakes is never off limits!

(...)
LOL

I did check this is indeed the "official" meaning of monologophobia. But it is absurd !
It should be called monologophilia, love of using a word only once.
Or polylogophobia, aversion to using the same word several times.

Etymologically, monologophobia should mean aversion to use a word only once ! Indeed, only once to use a word causing an avertion is what etymologically should be called monologophobia.

I am afraid that I am affected by this latter phobia. Indeed this latter phobia does affect me, I'm afraid
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

associate

Pronunciation
associate
/əˈsəʊʃɪeɪt/ /əˈsəʊsɪeɪt/
verb
[with object]often associate someone/something with
1 Connect (someone or something) with something else in one's mind.
1.1 Connect (something) with something else because they occur together or one produces the other.
1.2 be associated withBe involved with.
1.3 associate oneself with Allow oneself to be connected with or seen to be supportive of.
1.4 no object Meet or have dealings with someone regarded with disapproval.
Pronunciation
associate
/əˈsəʊʃɪət/ /əˈsəʊsɪət/
noun
1 A partner or companion in business or at work.
2 A person with limited or subordinate membership of an organization.
3 Psychology
A concept connected with another.
adjective
attributive
1 Connected with an organization or business.
1.1 Having shared function or membership but with a lesser status.

Origin
Late Middle English (as a verb in the sense ‘join with in a common purpose’; as an adjective in the sense ‘allied’): from Latin associat- ‘joined’, from the verb associare, from ad- ‘to’ + socius ‘sharing, allied’.

==========

Anyone who cares, should associate the late-day offering of the WotD with a tense day for the "author's" home teams of American football and baseball.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

banter

Pronunciation /ˈbantə/
noun
mass noun
The playful and friendly exchange of teasing remarks.
verb
[no object]
Exchange remarks in a good-humoured teasing way.

Origin
Late 17th century of unknown origin.

==========

At a family gathering, there is almost always some banter. Sometimes it nearly gets out of hand.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

inflate

Pronunciation /ɪnˈfleɪt/
verb
1 usually with object Fill (a balloon, tyre, or other expandable structure) with air or gas so that it becomes distended.
1.1 no object Become distended with air or gas.
2 usually with object Increase (something) by a large or excessive amount.
2.1 Exaggerate.
3 usually with object Bring about inflation of (a currency) or in (an economy)

Origin
Late Middle English from Latin inflat- ‘blown into’, from the verb inflare, from in- ‘into’ + flare ‘to blow’.

==========

If I intend to inflate my ego, I'm going to need both a powerful pump and an appropriate inflation needle.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Post by Algot Runeman »

horripilation

Pronunciation /hɒˌrɪpɪˈleɪʃ(ə)n/
noun
mass noun literary
The erection of hairs on the skin due to cold, fear, or excitement.
count noun ‘a horripilation of dread tingled down my spine’

Origin
Mid 17th century from late Latin horripilatio(n-), from Latin horrere ‘stand on end’ (see horrid) + pilus ‘hair’.

==========

You may imagine Fran's horripilation at the prospect of standing on the narrow, icy balcony. In fact, you must imagine it. She's wearing winter clothes.

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