GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Tue Aug 06, 2013 8:08 am

larrup

Pronunciation: /ˈlarəp/
verb (larrups, larruping, larruped)
[with object] informal
thrash or whip (someone).

Origin:
early 19th century (originally dialect): perhaps related to lather or leather

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==--==--==--==--==--==--==--==--==--==--==--==--==--==--==--==--==--==--==--==--==--==--==--==

Walter whacked, wolloped and larruped the rustlers after he had chased them and the stolen cattle halfway across Laramie county. He didn't wait for the sherriff to deal with the thieves. Walter stopped short of murder, though. It wasn't horse theft, after all.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Tue Aug 06, 2013 9:59 am

Algot Runeman wrote:irenic
When there was a heat wave, Irene daily went skinny dipping in the town's reservoir.
Since then, whenever the water tasted funny, people said it was irenic.

Algot Runeman wrote:larrup... Walter whacked, wolloped and larruped the rustlers ...
In short, they had themselves a baste!

BTW:
Should it be larruped or larrupped?
(I'm thinking of for example: Algot upped the stakes, but Voralfred one-upped him ...)
Is there a grammatical rule?
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Wed Aug 07, 2013 7:28 am

succuss

Pronunciation: /səˈkəs/
verb
[with object]
(in preparing homeopathic remedies) shake (a solution) vigorously.

Origin:
mid 19th century: from Latin succuss- 'shaken', from the verb succutere, from sub- 'away' + quatere 'to shake'

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Medical Expo

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

James Bond would never have said, "Succussed, not stirred." Though he might have considered the drink a remedy.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Thu Aug 08, 2013 7:14 am

extortion

Pronunciation: /ikˈstôrSHən/
noun
the practice of obtaining something, especially money, through force or threats.

Origin:
Middle English: from late Latin extortio(n-), from Latin extorquere 'wrest' (see extort)

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Paleontour

--++--++--++--++--++--++--++--++--++--++--++--++--++--++--++--++--++--++--++--++--++--++--

Theo was a thug.
Theo, always smug,
Got his daily portion
Through regular extortion.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Thu Aug 08, 2013 3:06 pm

Algot Runeman wrote:extortion
... Theo was a thug. ...

Extortionist:
- former husband of a contortionist

Theo was also an extortionist.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Fri Aug 09, 2013 1:25 pm

kerfuffle

Pronunciation: /kərˈfəfəl/
noun
[in singular] informal, chiefly British
a commotion or fuss, especially one caused by conflicting views:there was a kerfuffle over the chairmanship

Origin:
early 19th century: perhaps from Scots curfuffle (probably from Scottish Gaelic car 'twist, bend' + imitative Scots fuffle 'to disorder'), or related to Irish cior thual 'confusion, disorder'

!^*/+-!^*/+-!^*/+-!^*/+-!^*/+-!^*/+-!^*/+-!^*/+-!^*/+-!^*/+-!^*/+-!^*/+-!^*/+-!^*/+-!^*/+-

Carl conceded that he'd suffered after the recent math conference. The kerfuffle over positive and negative operators multiplied his difficulties solving simple problems and divided his loyalties.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sat Aug 10, 2013 6:50 am

decoct

Pronunciation: /diˈkäkt/
verb
[with object] archaic
extract the essence from (something) by heating or boiling it.

Origin:
late Middle English (in the sense 'cook, heat up'): from Latin decoct- 'boiled down', from the verb decoquere, from de- 'down' + coquere 'cook'

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C + O + R ====C + O + R ====C + O + R ====C + O + R ====C + O + R ====C + O + R ====C + O + R ====C + O + R ====C + O + R ====


Ester sought novel essences. She wanted to concoct her own soaps for the guest bathroom. For that, she needed to locate and decoct unusual but pleasant scents. Rosewater and glycerine were too mundane.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sun Aug 11, 2013 12:37 pm

patois

Pronunciation: /ˈpaˌtwä, ˈpä-/
noun (plural same )
the dialect of the common people of a region, differing in various respects from the standard language of the rest of the country:the nurse talked to me in a patois that even Italians would have had difficulty in understanding
the jargon or informal speech used by a particular social group:the raunchy patois of inner-city kids

Origin:
mid 17th century: French, literally 'rough speech', perhaps from Old French patoier 'treat roughly', from patte 'paw'

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Brent Moore

(---) [===] {~~~} (---) [===] {~~~} (---) [===] {~~~} (---) [===] {~~~} (---) [===] {~~~} (---) [===] {~~~} (---) [===] {~~~}

Rejoice and raise your lusty voice.
Sing the song both loud and long.
Show your spirit's very strong.
Formal or patois, your choice.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Mon Aug 12, 2013 2:14 am

Algot Runeman wrote:patois

Just to point out that someone is not included:
"Allez, embrassez moi. Non, pas toi, idiot!"
(Come on, embrace me. No, not you, idiot!)
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Mon Aug 12, 2013 5:09 am

doodle

Pronunciation: /ˈdo͞odl/

verb
[no object]
scribble absentmindedly: he was only doodling in the margin

noun
a rough drawing made absentmindedly.

Origin:

early 17th century (originally as a noun denoting a fool, later as a verb in the sense 'make a fool of, cheat'): from Low German dudeltopf, dudeldopp 'simpleton'. Current senses date from the 1930s

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superboreen

[ ] - [ ] - [ ] - [ ] - [ ] - [ ] - [ ] - [ ] - [ ] - [ ] - [ ] - [ ] - [ ] - [ ] - [ ] - [ ] - [ ] - [ ] - [ ] - [ ] - [ ]

During the months of the off season, Maurice fiddled and diddled, dawdled and doodled. In the end, he'd written what would become the most widely read and highly acclaimed novel about the world of professional basketball.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Mon Aug 12, 2013 7:36 am

Algot Runeman wrote:doodle

When I search for info about something particular, I mostly google.

But when I do NOT want that info, I doodle.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Mon Aug 12, 2013 3:53 pm

According the the Dictionary of American Regional English:

"A small indefinite amount -- I'll just take a wingding doodle of cream in my coffee."
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Tue Aug 13, 2013 9:34 am

esculent

Pronunciation: /ˈeskyələnt/
formal
adjective
fit to be eaten; edible.

noun
a thing, especially a vegetable, fit to be eaten.

Origin:
early 17th century: from Latin esculentus, from esca 'food', from esse 'eat'

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Luis Tamayo

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Bugs was bugged, seriously. He had ordered carrots—what else?—but the waiter brought out a bowl of carets, definitely not esculent.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Wed Aug 14, 2013 6:36 am

alexia

Pronunciation: /əˈleksēə/
noun
the inability to see words or to read, caused by a defect of the brain. Also called word blindness.Compare with dyslexia.

Origin:
late 19th century: from a-1 'without' + Greek lexis 'speech', from legein 'speak', which was confused with Latin legere 'read'


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==== ==== ==== ==== ==== ==== ==== ==== ==== ==== ==== ==== ==== ==== ==== ====

Sandy sat staring at his desk. He hoped that there would be a good explanation and discussion today. The subject was interesting, but recently, Mrs. Potter had been pulling back on the in-class lecture and discussion. She was expecting everybody to read the textbook for the next day's activities. Sandy's mom wasn't home this week and Dad was working extra hours. Sandy's alexia would become a problem if something didn't change soon. The school records had his condition noted, but Mrs. Potter might have missed it. Sandy didn't advertise his difficulty if he could work around it.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Wed Aug 14, 2013 10:00 am

Algot Runeman wrote:alexia

If I understood correctly, alexia is a neurological defect.

There is also anatomical, fortunately only partial alexia. The blind spot in the retina causes all vertebrates to have this defect, even those that never could read.

As we scan a page to read, instead of staring at a single spot in the middle, we never notice the existence of the blind spot.

Do you see the girl hanging out of the train window in my signature? With the test described here you can make her pants disappear. :lol:
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Wed Aug 14, 2013 4:04 pm

When I taught middle school science, one of our favorite sequences of activity centered on the senses. We did several experiments, including the blind spot test. The kids found it fascinating. Thanks for reminding me, E.P.S.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Wed Aug 14, 2013 4:46 pm

Algot Runeman wrote:... several experiments, including the blind spot test. The kids found it fascinating. Thanks for reminding me, E.P.S.

You're quite welcome.

You know? Getting older I've noticed that all my senses have been suffering more and more blind spots here and there. That is, occasional failures of sight, hearing, taste, balance and other senses.

Though in one aspect my senses remain as acute as ever. I never fail to notice a pretty women go by, by her looks, the sound of her steps, her smell or by my vertigo. Fortunately, but I wonder why ...
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Thu Aug 15, 2013 6:54 am


proband


Pronunciation: /ˈprōˌband, prōˈband/
noun
a person serving as the starting point for the genetic study of a family (used especially in medicine and psychiatry).

Origin:
1920s: from Latin probandus 'to be proved', gerundive of probare 'to test'

1---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Rolling Stones volunteered to be probands in the genetic study, but they were turned down. The scientists preferred members of amateur bands.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Fri Aug 16, 2013 12:57 pm

vinous

Pronunciation: /ˈvīnəs/
adjective
resembling, associated with, or fond of wine:a vinous smell
of the reddish color of wine.

Origin:
late Middle English: from Latin vinum 'wine' + -ous

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Image Credit: George Redgrave

./^\./^\./^\./^\./^\./^\./^\./^\./^\./^\./^\./^\./^\./^\./^\./^\./^\./^\./^\./^\./^\./^\./^\.

Some people say, "Grape juice is vaguely vinous."
Others say, "Tall bottles with corks are vinous."
Still others say, "I love wine with good food." and, therefore, are fondly described as vinous. Maybe they are gourmands, too.
Yet there remain a set of people who say, "Gimme da jug in dat papuh bag." They are rarely described as vinous, but generally called winos.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sat Aug 17, 2013 6:44 am

slew Definition 3

Pronunciation: /slo͞o/

noun
informal, chiefly North American
a large number or quantity of something:he asked me a slew of questions

Origin:
mid 19th century: from Irish sluagh

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-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

Ryan wanted some way to skew the results so he hired a slew of pretty women to serve the brew. The miners were happy, the workmen were eager for more. At the end of the week, Ryan's pub had set itself apart from the others with a count of customers which set a record, brand new.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sun Aug 18, 2013 6:16 am

atrabilious

Pronunciation: /ˌatrəˈbilēəs, -ˈbilyəs/
adjective
literary
melancholy or ill-tempered.

Origin:
mid 17th century (in the sense 'affected by black bile', one of the four supposed cardinal humors of the body, believed to cause melancholy): from Latin atra bilis 'black bile', translation of Greek melankholia 'melancholy', + -ious

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{.,.,.,.} {.,.,.,.} {.,.,.,.} {.,.,.,.} {.,.,.,.} {.,.,.,.} {.,.,.,.} {.,.,.,.} {.,.,.,.} {.,.,.,.} {.,.,.,.}

Atticus attracted Alices attention with an atrabilious gaze. She told him to lighten up. Of course, he did not.
Last edited by Algot Runeman on Sun Aug 18, 2013 5:23 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Sun Aug 18, 2013 4:32 pm

E Pericoloso Sporgersi wrote:(...)

Do you see the girl hanging out of the train window in my signature? With the test described here you can make her pants disappear. :lol:


How disappointing !
EPS, this is the standard trick! The pants and everything else disappeared !
I was hoping for some new, clever trick to have just the pants disappear, not what they contained...


Incidentally, sorry for contributing so little recently. Bad connection.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sun Aug 18, 2013 5:26 pm

voralfred wrote:Incidentally, sorry for contributing so little recently. Bad connection.


We have been atrabilious without you.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Mon Aug 19, 2013 7:11 am

roué

Pronunciation: /ro͞oˈā/
noun
a debauched man, especially an elderly one.

Origin:
early 19th century: French, literally 'broken on a wheel', referring to the instrument of torture thought to be deserved by such a person

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☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡☡

In foul juices was he stewin'.
Early work forgotten.
"Roué!" shouted women.
He ended life in ruin.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Mon Aug 19, 2013 9:39 am

Algot Runeman wrote:roué

Considering the meaning of roué, one can wonder what rouen stands for.

P.S. Rouen is a French city, somewhat infamous for the burning of Joan of Arc.
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